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also known as Wo die grünen Ameisen träumen

Where the Green Ants Dream1984

  • 4.0
Werner Herzog's films have taken him from the jungles of Peru to the peaks of Himalayas to the sole human outpost in Antarctica in a quest to find landscapes to inspire him and the dreamers who embrace those lands. WHERE THE GREEN ANTS DREAM is the Australian outback, specifically a sacred spot where an Aboriginal tribe takes a stand against a mining company. It is a film about ancient spiritualism colliding with modern culture in both the sun-blasted no man's land of the Outback and the consumer society of the city. And while it is inspired by real events, Herzog not only fictionalizes the drama but the mythology of his protestors as well. Herzog casts some of Australia's greatest talents, including Bruce Spence, Norman Kaye and Paul Cox in his one-and-only down-under production and adds the hypnotic sounds of the didgeridoo to his atmospheric score. - Sean Axmaker

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1 member likes this review

An unforgettable Herzog film, this film captures the Desert at its most real - the indigenous and aboriginal people of Australia are captured full-fledged while their civilized homeland is torn apart by the neighboring White civilization. We've seen Whites destroy other races (if you remember European history, the Whites destroyed a large portion of the red race when they conquested North America, because of their deadly diseases.) but we've never seen an honest and silent portrayal as this film captures.

The opening shot of a fuzzy landscape must direct us towards no solid answer, the peaceful and hopeful peoples simply wanted both (or really, three oppositional forces) to make peace with themselves. I was surprised with the ending - the dynamite which destroyed the Desert, also destroyed the Earth (where the indigenous people more than likely buried their past ancestors for over 200 years.) I think Herzog (as usual, imo) has every scene and moment perfected... Obviously, this film wins.

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Member Reviews (13)

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top reviewer

This film is really great, and has a lot of great moments, but totally falls apart with the epic failure courtroom scene at the end. The Aborigines and their mythology are compelling (actually, the myth about green ants' dreams is a hodgepodge of Aboriginal myths, not exactly an authentic myth, but similar).

1 member likes this review

An unforgettable Herzog film, this film captures the Desert at its most real - the indigenous and aboriginal people of Australia are captured full-fledged while their civilized homeland is torn apart by the neighboring White civilization. We've seen Whites destroy other races (if you remember European history, the Whites destroyed a large portion of the red race when they conquested North America, because of their deadly diseases.) but we've never seen an honest and silent portrayal as this film captures.

The opening shot of a fuzzy landscape must direct us towards no solid answer, the peaceful and hopeful peoples simply wanted both (or really, three oppositional forces) to make peace with themselves. I was surprised with the ending - the dynamite which destroyed the Desert, also destroyed the Earth (where the indigenous people more than likely buried their past ancestors for over 200 years.) I think Herzog (as usual, imo) has every scene and moment perfected... Obviously, this film wins.

1 member likes this review
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filmmaker

A prophetic poem for Western civil (?)ization.

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top reviewer

This hit and miss drama has something to offer but doesn't connect and at times seems forced. The Aboriginal actors did a great job, the rest not so much. Indicative of today's news, which obviously will be going on until the end of time, it is about the exploitation of native lands for corporate profits and makes it's point there.

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top reviewer

The trope lives on...but the scenery is wonderful. The characters are believable and gently done.

As mesmerizing now (2015) as the first time I saw it. An uncanny peering into the soul and depth of Earth's oldest civilization.

Lyrical. The contested landscape--stark, windswept, violated by mining--is beautifully captured. It's a simple story that feels more fable than real, even though it's based on true events.

Beautifully poetic, rich, humanistic film from Herzog.

I liked it because it is a classic example of how outsiders try to come in and dictate how locals should live... I support locals!

Will we EVER learn what is important… ?

boaring boaring boaring

Wonderful! Not tpo be missed!

great docu movie