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also known as The Life and Times of John Howard Griffin

Uncommon Vision2011

  • 3.8
Morgan Atkinson's fascinating documentary reviews the complex, dramatic life of white Texan John Howard Griffin who, in 1959, famously "passed" as black to expose society's treatment of African Americans. But that incendiary journalistic coup was hardly the only dramatic chapter in his life, which also included Parisian studies as a composer, miraculously recovering from ten years of WWII combat-caused blindness and, later, esteem as a photographer. But Griffin will always be remembered primarily for the articles that became a 1961 book (followed by a movie) entitled "Black Like Me," detailing how he used various skin-darkening techniques to become a "newly created Negro" and was immediately stunned by the "hate stares" and "inhuman" treatment common from white folk throughout the South. When the story of this six-week experiment broke, its controversy was such that he was hung in effigy on the main street of his own Texas hometown. This posthumous portrait shed light on a most uncommon life. - Dennis Harvey

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Member Reviews (3)

incredibly moving and apropos for our racist times

Given the resurgence of racial and xenophobic violence, this is a must see.

FOUND VERY INTERESTING.. VERY REVEALING REMEMBER THE FILE DIDN'T KNOW THE REAL PERSONS BACKGROUND...