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also known as Cinévardaphoto

Ulysse1982

  • 4.0
For ULYSSE, Agnes Varda grants herself the unusual screen credit of cinecrit, but the exercise in question is actually the titular photograph she took on a beach in 1954. She tracks down two of her three former models (the third is a dead goat) to find out if the picture still means as much to them as it does to her, only to discover they have no memory of it at all. This leads to Proustian ruminations on the succession of selves and the mystery of images. Viewing another photo of himself from the same period, her model says, "I remember the jacket, but I don't remember the person." Frustrated in her attempts to understand its hold on her, she digs through the records of that period in history and her life, until ultimately the picture seems to be about everything except what's in it.

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1 member likes this review

This movie is a testament to the power that images alone have to tell stories. They can inspire your curiosity and push you to create even more. It took Varda all of 22 minutes to explore themes of memory, art, history, and fantasy. You've got a free half an hour, watch it.

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Member Reviews (6)

180197.small
top reviewer

This movie is a testament to the power that images alone have to tell stories. They can inspire your curiosity and push you to create even more. It took Varda all of 22 minutes to explore themes of memory, art, history, and fantasy. You've got a free half an hour, watch it.

1 member likes this review
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top reviewer

Imagine taking one image out of the countless number that exist in one's life and tracing its meaning through multiple perspectives: the subjects in the image; the artist who captured the image; the world as it existed on the day the image was formed. Varda does all of this in an utterly compelling meditation that reminds us that any one moment generates a lifetime of implications.

1 member likes this review

In interesting precedent to Varda's later work in self-aware documentaries.

1 member likes this review
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top reviewer

Agnes Varda is just the greatest.

Beautiful documentary, poesy of the words, pictures, and moving pictures; of Varda's voice.

Varda is fantastic!