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Theory of Achievement1991

  • 4.0
Director Hal Hartley introduces "Low-rent real estate agent" Bob as he is trying to entice two highly unconvinced hipsters to move to the future "21st Century art capital," Williamsburg (back in the days when it could still be funny that anyone would want to live in Brooklyn). In desperation, he sublets his girlfriend’s apartment to another couple. This proves to be problematic since his girlfriend is still in residence! With its self-parodying art-film tropes and characters that raise life’s "Big Questions," this miniature is Hal Hartley in a droll nutshell. Plus: the accordion-stylings of Jeffrey Howard! - Dennis Harvey

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2 members like this review

This short film exemplifies why I love Hartley's early works. This film shows Brooklyn before all of the squares wanted to move out of the burbs and live in cities again. As someone who lived in various cities (including Brooklyn) in the 90's it is amusing to watch his portrayal of people who lived there at that time. I really like his old school stuff and the cast are always great even if they aren't all top notch actors.

Member Reviews (3)

This short film exemplifies why I love Hartley's early works. This film shows Brooklyn before all of the squares wanted to move out of the burbs and live in cities again. As someone who lived in various cities (including Brooklyn) in the 90's it is amusing to watch his portrayal of people who lived there at that time. I really like his old school stuff and the cast are always great even if they aren't all top notch actors.

2 members like this review

I lived in Williamsburg in the late '80s/90's. This whimsical, super-stylish short film captures the absurdity of that raw place of yore, which so quickly became populated with imports and wanna-bes. An elegant and funny film with a cool sense of cinema history and a dash of philosophy.

Hartley's early work are the best!