Watch the full film on the
Welcome to Fandor. Watch thousands of award-winning films online. ×
Click here to take a look at our newly redesigned movie page.

The Woman with the Hungry Eyes2006

  • 4.1
Wearing only a metal snake bra between her waistline and her exotic kohl-lined eyes, Hollywood’s first and foremost vamp Theda Bara dazzles audiences in THE WOMAN WITH THE HUNGRY EYES.

Copy embed code

×

What makes this film worth watching? See All Reviews

"...traces the mystique and magic of Theda Bara and discovers a great deal of wonderful surprises along the way." - Phil Hall, Film Threat


3 members like this review

Wonderful! My husband and I had been waiting to see this for years. It was well worth the wait. Lots of previously unseen photos. Fabulously detailed and informative. Every silent film fan needs to see this one! Highly recommended!

Picture?width=100&height=100
top reviewer

Member Reviews (22)

Picture?width=100&height=100
top reviewer

Wonderful! My husband and I had been waiting to see this for years. It was well worth the wait. Lots of previously unseen photos. Fabulously detailed and informative. Every silent film fan needs to see this one! Highly recommended!

3 members like this review
Picture?width=100&height=100
filmmaker

In response to shantipur:

Hi, this is filmmaker Hugh Munro Neely. No, I don't think Theda was a virgin when she married Brabin, she was just much better than most actresses of her day at keeping secrets. And very few rumors about her saw the light of day, too. We did look long and hard for any stories about Theda's love life that could be verified in any way, and we found her incredibly oblique reference to her love affair with Isadora Duncan's brother, Raymond (who is pictured, but not named in the doc), which was subsequently verified by both Mary Desti and Preston Sturges' memoirs. Was that her only pre-marital romance? I doubt it, but we were unable to turn up anything else. So it remains a mystery...and I'm sure it would have tickled Theda to know she had put another one over on posterity!

1 member likes this review
94514.small
top reviewer

A hundred years later, we forget just how sophisticated silent films were. The complexity and genuine genius of Theda Bara is never more apparent than from her publicity stills which end up being all we have left of the first vamp. Vamp derives from female vampire as this film so beautifully displays. And Theda Bara was the first woman to captivate and utterly mesmerize her men with her beauty and mystery. She defined the movie star as not only a commodity but as the vital essence of sex appeal and magic that no man could resist. Before there was Anjelina Jolie, Elizabeth Taylor, Greta Garbo, there was Theda Bara -- goddess and siren. Silent film establishes from the start our love affair with the image of woman as divine queen and muse.

1 member likes this review
Picture?width=100&height=100
top reviewer

Using an excellent array of intimate and obscure photos and scenes from a few surviving films, this wonderfully extensive documentary reveals a fascinating portrait of one of the greatest film stars. Now almost completely forgotten, Theda Bara (which is not an anagram for arab death, just a playful nickname) proves to be an enigmatic and savy businesswoman who lived a mostly happy and fulfilling life. Bravo Theodosia and Bravo Hugh!

1 member likes this review

This documentary is what brought me to this site in the first place. It's really sad how few of her films are still known to exist.

1 member likes this review

Fascinating documentary about an actress I only knew by name. Her life as portrayed seems to have been a fairly calm one particularly when you consider the kinds of characters she played. Well worth watching if for no other reason than to gain a better understanding of the silent film era.

1 member likes this review

An excellent, entertaining production which should not be missed. A must-see for anyone with an interest in screen actresses, especially of the pre-dialogue era.

1 member likes this review

This is a fantastic documentary on a fascinating woman. I learned a lot about Theda Bara, but I also learned a lot about the craft of Silents...it was intriguing to find out about the grand pantomime gestures and the crossovers from Theatre to Film. I absolutely loved this...I wish there was more....

1 member likes this review

A tantalizing look at an artist whose work is all but gone. Anyone who is interested in film history and expecially women in film should see this!

1 member likes this review

This movie takes me back to an America that was. A motion. A glance A look from Theda Bara and people remember forever. Thank you for a wonderful film.

1 member likes this review
161260.small
top reviewer

a fifteen minute film that was stretched, like cold taffy to a full two hour S&M classic

Picture?width=100&height=100
top reviewer

Excellent bio - ICON

I thoroughly enjoyed this. If only her movies hadn't been lost!

Very interesting. I never heard of her before.

Wonderful documentary of a alluring Jewish actress.

very thorough, enjoyed all of this film.

What a great documentary! Considering Hollywood's "thirst" for vampires lately, it is fascinating to learn about the original Vamp. It is also quite an achievement of storytelling considering most of her films have been lost. Highly recommend.

An exquisite tribute to a silent film era icon!

Fabulous! An excellent presentation that makes one want to view The Woman with the Hungry Eyes more than once!

Fascinating. I learned a great deal and saw rare film clips of Theda Bara I had not seen.

Not a bad overview of the life of Theda Bara. Given the paucity of material, and a sad lack of footage of her films (that late 30s fire at the old Fox studios was devastating to film historians), I thought they put the package totegether competently. There was a surprising lack of personal intimate detail--sorry, but this was a film about a salacious figure, at least on screen and I woulkd have expected a few roll-in the-hay details.. Perhaos there weren't any; perhaps she truly was a nice Jewish girl who said "no no no" until she was 40-ish. I guess we;ll never know...or else the documentarians protected her a little too much.

A good overview of the life of Theda Bara.