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The Woman in Green1945

  • 3.8
THE WOMAN IN GREEN reintroduced Holmes' evil alter ego, Professor Moriarty, now played with suave coolness by the London-born Henry Daniell. Years later, reflecting on the Holmes series, Rathbone wrote: "There were other Moriartys but none so delectably dangerous as was that of Henry Daniell." Executive producer Howard S. Benedict concurred but the character of Moriarty died a conclusive death in this film and did not return to haunt Homes or movie audiences again, at least in this series. Reportedly Daniell was a serious fellow with interests in Eastern philosophy, a strict professional who kept to himself during filming. He certainly had no patience for delays on the set. The rest of the cast was far more relaxed. When a cocktail lounge scene between Rathbone and Hillary Brooke was taking too long to shoot, the pair decided to play-act at getting drunk, eventually slipping under the table to disappear! Gas-rationing had emptied American roads of foreign cars, but four of them rented at rates of $35 and $50 each, did turn up in THE WOMAN IN GREEN. Two were classics from the late 1920's: the French Renault taxi and its British counterpart, the Martin. Such motoring curios would grace other Holmes films as well, providing a delightful, albeit brief showcase for the car aficionado.

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1 member likes this review

Excellent plot and acting. Holmes would be nothing, though without Dr. Watson. But I was sort of weirded out because the actor playing Moriarity looked too much like Richard Nixon lol

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Member Reviews (3)

170548.small
top reviewer

Excellent plot and acting. Holmes would be nothing, though without Dr. Watson. But I was sort of weirded out because the actor playing Moriarity looked too much like Richard Nixon lol

1 member likes this review
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The Sherlock Holmes pictures produced by Universal Studios in the 1940's are offer a vivid example of the broad landscape found within the term "B-Movie." Second features of the mid-century ran the gamut of entertainment expectations, from the zero-budget stiffness of movies from Poverty Row, to Westerns and Horror films, to the moderate productions released by major studios to fill the weekly bill at the local theater. "The Woman in Green" showcases the steady workmanship of these latter types of B's. It's a rock-solid mystery that combines elements of classic horror with film noir, punctuated with a ghastly aura that permeates the film, all of which is accomplished in an hour and some change. It's a testimony to cast and crew that these films are still enjoyed by modern audiences some seven decades after their initial release.

Rathbone & Bruce will always be THE Holmes & Watson for so many fans out there. Watching this you can see why. There's a very casual chemistry between the two of them that indicates that they've been fast friends for a very long time. This translates to the screen impeccibly.