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also known as La sixième face du pentagone

The Sixth Side of the Pentagon1967

  • 3.8
On October 21, 1967, over 100,000 protestors gathered in Washington, D.C., for the Mobilization to End the War in Vietnam. It was the largest protest gathering yet, and it brought together a wide cross-section of liberals, radicals, hippies, and Yippies. Che Guevara had been killed in Bolivia only two weeks previously, and, for many, it was the transition from simply marching against the war, to taking direct action to try to stop the "American war machine." Norman Mailer wrote about the events in Armies of the Night. French filmmaker Chris Marker, leading a team of filmmakers, was also there, and made THE SIXTH SIDE OF THE PENTAGON. From young men burning their draft cards, to the Yippies chanting "Out, demons, out!" while trying to levitate the Pentagon, to thousands of protestors rushing the steps of the Pentagon itself and some actually getting into the building, THE SIXTH SIDE OF THE PENTAGON, by contemporaneously putting us in the midst of the action yet combining the experience with a wry and reflective commentary, is a remarkable time capsule and reminder of events from forty years ago, 1967-the turning point of opposition to a long and unpopular war.

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"The strength of this work is undeniable, regardless of how one reads the politics." - Rodney Perkins, Twitch


3 members like this review

This is a great documentary showing the strength of the, quite justified, adversity against the war. It's refreshing to look back at this film and see that American citizens have, for the most part, always had a sense of when the government is doing right and when they are doing wrong (e.g. the Occupy Movement and recent protests against police brutality).

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Member Reviews (1)

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top reviewer

This is a great documentary showing the strength of the, quite justified, adversity against the war. It's refreshing to look back at this film and see that American citizens have, for the most part, always had a sense of when the government is doing right and when they are doing wrong (e.g. the Occupy Movement and recent protests against police brutality).

3 members like this review