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The Silver Screen: Color Me Lavender1997

  • 3.5
From the ground-breaking director of ROCK HUDSON'S HOME MOVIES, Mark Rappaport takes us on a hilarious and provocative romp through the hidden and not-so-hidden undercurrents of Hollywood's Golden Years. Dan Butler acts as tour guide as he uncovers (despite efforts to launder American cinema of even the faintest traces of gay influences) Hollywood's. Through the use of ingenious film clips, along with Rappaport's signature witty insights, THE SILVER SCREEN: COLOR ME LAVENDER brilliantly uncovers the unmistakable flirtations and the ambiguous behavior that richly imbued the performances of Danny Kaye, Jerry Lewis, Gary Grant and other film legends.THE SILVER SCREEN: COLOR ME LAVENDER is a rich and funny meditation on American sexual identity, film history and culture that will change the way you look at westerns or the campy charades of Bob Hope and Bing Crosby in their "buddy"пїЅ road movies forever.

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2 members like this review

It is interesting how you do not see the obvious when growing up when the movies depicted here in "The Silver Screen: Color Me Lavender" were ubiquitous but now that one is older, you see these movies and the camp and blatant homo-eroticism for what they were; groundbreaking, legendary performances by a handful of actors that did not take the status quo as acceptable and in their roles, railed against the anti-gay (or in those days "anti-fruit" or "anti-fairy") machine.

Perhaps this was how the gay rights movement was fought before there were such commonplace things as gay rights.

When seen through the lens of Mr. Rappaport, I can see that gays have come much further in the past 80 years than I ever would have thought possible or appreciated as I do now having seen this film.

From unbridled gaeity in the movies of the 1930s to having now 9 states having legalized gay marriage and two gay marriage measures being decided upon by the Supreme Court of the United States in the 2nd decade of the 21st century, the entertainment industry that has always been the counter cultural equivalent to mainstream morality turns the mirror back on that morality and forces it to see that what it has always rebuked, chided and ridiculed is no less than the very class of people that made it the giant it is today.

Brilliant piece of work!

Member Reviews (20)

It is interesting how you do not see the obvious when growing up when the movies depicted here in "The Silver Screen: Color Me Lavender" were ubiquitous but now that one is older, you see these movies and the camp and blatant homo-eroticism for what they were; groundbreaking, legendary performances by a handful of actors that did not take the status quo as acceptable and in their roles, railed against the anti-gay (or in those days "anti-fruit" or "anti-fairy") machine.

Perhaps this was how the gay rights movement was fought before there were such commonplace things as gay rights.

When seen through the lens of Mr. Rappaport, I can see that gays have come much further in the past 80 years than I ever would have thought possible or appreciated as I do now having seen this film.

From unbridled gaeity in the movies of the 1930s to having now 9 states having legalized gay marriage and two gay marriage measures being decided upon by the Supreme Court of the United States in the 2nd decade of the 21st century, the entertainment industry that has always been the counter cultural equivalent to mainstream morality turns the mirror back on that morality and forces it to see that what it has always rebuked, chided and ridiculed is no less than the very class of people that made it the giant it is today.

Brilliant piece of work!

2 members like this review
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top reviewer

This fascinating short shows film that considers visual narrative, camera angle, and altered time sequencing - for example, a scene of rescue indoors is repeated seen from outdoors. An interesting window into film evolving into its own art and not just a static record in real time.

1 member likes this review
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top reviewer

Rappaport's overly and overtly analysed apologia to gay love and desire is just too smarmy and prissy for its own good. Though I love the obvious scenes of feminized men in classic movies, and Hollywood's bigotry put on its ear. the fingerpointing is too comfortably selected. Why bring up the Cary Grant/ Randolph Scott relationship again, or the sexually ambiguous hero/sidekick ad nauseum. To quote Saturday Nite Live - "Sometimes a banana is just a banana!"

1 member likes this review

I enjoyed the movie; star actors back in the day were so good looking. Some of the scenes taken for the film I had never seen before, at least not in the same perspective.

1 member likes this review
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top reviewer

FOOLIN AROUND WITH MY HARMONICA

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top reviewer

I found this to be a very highly educated movie . I know about our past History. Why it was the era of my parents , Grandparents. I can remember them talking about did you see those two guys dancing together . laugh ! drink their coffee . The 50's were one of the most repressive times from what I have educated my self on when it came to Homosexuality. Fathers such as mine to this day are rugged tough , Yet not aware of what there real sexuality could have been . Example , My father is 75. Does not look a day over 60,,was a jock, played sports . as he grew to be an engineer , and as he got to be around my age which is close to 50, I noticed as a young Male growing up, That he was always in the company of young males and still chooses to do so to this day. But when I his son who is gay . would make a remark to him about his friends etc. Oh he would just go raving mad how he hates gay people . .I ask him well you do not hate me . he says that's Different I made you your my son. Sort of like one of those one liners the producer uses to show in this film . Hollywood actors had to hide , yes there will be so many that were gay in their time that we will never know about . But common , A wife for a actor was a Prop. So that it was not public knowledge . And I look at this era and this time. from the start of movies to up until the Late 1960s till even now how can they just hide it like it was a disease . Look at it this way . During Pride week watch Turner Classics and watch how Hollywood did use homosexuality in the movies there is a whole week of gay and Lesbien films out there . and they are good . Turner films always had pride week as one of its best silver lined screen showings. The Producer of this film is awesome and showing us the hidden messages . ones I always saw watching old films in my own gay era , would shake my head and ask what is so different now that was different then other then that perhaps we are a more except it more in our society cities , But I dare you to have the glass balls to live in the outer suburbs of Places where I grew up like Mars Pa 18 miles out of the city of Pittsburgh . You live in outer city Land , You may as well just Put your face in your hands find a girl friend for a prop and do not talk to anyone about being gay or bring up Homosexuality it is considered Tabu.I give the film producers and makers of this a 100 thumbs up . Wonder just how many in our own families Hid all their lives and were afraid to come out . I know of 7 of us who did in my family . and One who lived as to be 104 That was my great aunt who lived her life style to the hilt as a Delicate Lesbien . Hmm And they still think it is not Genetic . Thank you for making this movie . Howard E Crowe III Mars PA>

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top reviewer

Outstanding and entertaining!

Interesting, but I felt some of the logic was sketchy and blatant assumptions made. I wish there’d been some actual comment on the cultural and sociological mores of the particular times referenced in the film clips shown as evidence.

Seemingly there is repressed homosexuality everywhere in American cinema, from the 30s and onwards. And probably there is, too. Mark Rappaport is always titillating and often annoying in his insistence, but he never hides and is always open about his agenda, in many cases and in obvious parentheses telling us useful or naughty tidbits that is more, or less, relevant to the topic. More time than I would have preferred was used to screen scenes from Bob Hope/Bing Crosby movies to drive more or less the same point home, but it was always entertaining.

I found this documentary even more interesting than the Celluloid Closet.

Great fun!

ok historically duly noted.

entertaining

This was an enjoyable film to watch, though not quite as compelling as THE CELLLULOID CLOSET - which it very closely resembles. Still, as I said, fun to watch.

why is this gpddamned thing so impossible to navigate. ???? you cant get bored with a movie and then pick another !!!! I am getting to hate this

Interesting view of homosexuality in film of 1930's, 40's, 50's. How much is conjecture and how much is fact! lol!

great---entertaining

all right already. its like beating a dead horse...no pun intended.

enjoyed the content; but didn't not enjoy the lag and stalling through out the movie.

Very thought provoking and entertaining