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also known as Le mort qui tue

The Murderous Corpse1913

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  • 4.0
With his mentor Inspector Juve missing, journalist Jérôme Fandor (Georges Melchior) assumes the difficult task of pursuing the infamous Fantômas (René Navarre), a frightfully brilliant villain who excels in deception, larceny and murder. In this third film of the classic silent film series, Fantômas uses a dead artist's fingerprints to keep the pesky police constantly guessing.

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Member Reviews (4)

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One of the most exciting of the Fantomas films. I am consistently amazed at how Louis Feuillade keeps each one fresh and uniquely interesting. Great use of disguises and identities and another great ending.

After the abrupt end of the second of Feullade's films I was quite anxious to resume the story and find out the fate of Juve and Fandor. The latter is the main character and investigator here as Juve is reported to have perished in the explosion that was part of the diabolical Fantômas's trap. This film is a little confusing. Was the artist Dollon chosen as a pawn for some reason? It is hard to think that Fantômas acts without a blueprint and would just choose him at random. He evil one is also obviously unrepentant and homicidal so why the intricate plan to make it seem like a dead man is committing more murders? The answer isn't there but it is still fun to watch. I'll get you next time Fantômas!

It,s Good ! Says Bruno! in Love!

Well, if you don't read the inconveniently spoiler-bearing story synopsis provided by Fandor before watching this episode, the story seems as if it would be genuinely enticing. The soundtrack is so awesome, also. The feeling of suspense achieved here is incredible considering how little ground work had been done in the field of crime thrillers. Or thrillers at all, as far as I know.