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also known as La mala ordina

The Italian Connection1972

  • 3.9
The second film in Fernando Di Leo's Milieu Trilogy focuses on Luca Carnali, a small-time mobster and pimp who has been set up by his gangland boss. When a shipment of heroin disappears between Italy and New York, Carnali is framed for the theft. Carnali is pursued through Milan by a pair of merciless American hit men (played by Henry Silva and Woody Strode) and referenced by Quentin Tarantino in PULP FICTION, whom mistakenly believe that he has stolen a drug shipment. Following the murder of his wife, the hunted becomes the hunter as Carnali takes his revenge on his boss, the hit men and anyone else who stand in his way.

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3 members like this review

Bang! Fernadno Di Leo’s crime movies are violent, colorful, haymaker punches loaded with bullets, fists, and more bullets. In “The Italian Connection,” Di Leo twists and turns through the streets of Milan. It’s a town full of Eurotrash tough guys and glam gun molls in mirco-minis. De Leo sits right between the taut, machine-like, films of Don Siegel and the epic vision of his onetime collaborator, Sergio Leone. “The Italian Connection,” and Di Leo’s other mafia films are a must for fans of action and gangster movies.

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Member Reviews (6)

81629.small
top reviewer

Bang! Fernadno Di Leo’s crime movies are violent, colorful, haymaker punches loaded with bullets, fists, and more bullets. In “The Italian Connection,” Di Leo twists and turns through the streets of Milan. It’s a town full of Eurotrash tough guys and glam gun molls in mirco-minis. De Leo sits right between the taut, machine-like, films of Don Siegel and the epic vision of his onetime collaborator, Sergio Leone. “The Italian Connection,” and Di Leo’s other mafia films are a must for fans of action and gangster movies.

3 members like this review
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top reviewer

Don't piss off Luca Canali!! Great "spy jazz" score and with Woody Strode, Henry Silva and a host of hot chicks how can you go wrong?

1 member likes this review

Watching this a second time confirmed my love of the lead performance by Mario Adorf. He's a gentle bear increasingly freaked out and confused because he's a pawn whose life crumbling is incidental to larger forces at work, a scapegoat in a power struggle. My favorite of the Mileu trilogy because of the ways these emotions register on his face, and how every action move and plot betrayal feeds into his sense of helplessness.

There's an element of wish fulfillment: the nice guy loser gets to demonstrate his macho qualities. As in the other Di Leo films there's also a sense of a world beyond cops and robbers: here Luca is friends with a swinging 60's chick who seems to have successfully rejected violence through a regimen of orgies, dancing and blue afros.

Villainwise the film is strong, with its mini-Thunderball reunion, and excellent use of Woody Strode and Henry Silva as stone-faced killers. (Another reviewer believes they actually killed a kitten for this film: I thought it looked fake and sincerely do not want to go back to learn if it is not.) It's a B-movie with Euro sleaze and charm but again one whose lead performance energizes its clockwork toughness.

What a strange mixture of 70's glam, corniness and graphic violence. This movie held my attention for sure. Spoiler alert:

I don't understand why the film makers decided to kill the kitten in the end. It was clearly dead. There was no need for it, and it's not clear what a dead, innocent animal adds to the film. I'm glad that today there are animal protection laws in place. Apparently less so in the 70's. Based on that alone, no rating.

Great crime drama, enjoyed the whole trilogy

Really enjoyable film. Great acting and some decent humour, and, of course, the sexy fillies.