Watch the full film on the
Welcome to Fandor. Watch thousands of award-winning films online. ×

The House at the Edge of the Galaxy2013

  • 3.3
The House at the Edge of the Galaxy is an allegorical short film about the beauty and significance of the here and now, versus the quest for the bigger and better world perpetually beyond our grasp. This cosmic tale takes place at a desolate outpost where a lonely boy is taught by a passing Cosmonaut how to plant a "star" to transform his existence. In the process of yearning for the heavens, he discovers that paradise instead resides in his own backyard.

Copy embed code

×

What makes this film worth watching? See All Reviews

4 members like this review

"A young boy (Grayson Sides), nameless, resides alone in a house in the middle of the woods. Unable to escape, as running in any direction only returns him home, the boy sits hopeless. That is, until he meets cosmonaut Yuri (Richard Manichello), who arrives talking about exploring the stars. As the boy questions the activity of chasing down stars based on light given off from a star that may’ve long since died, Yuri gives the boy a “star seed,” and tasks the boy with caring for it. If the boy grows his own star, perhaps it will remove the fear of chasing a light that could result in nothing.

Gleb Osatinski’s The House at the Edge of the Galaxy is the type of short film that inspires discussion and thought long after it ends. Interpretations will vary in almost every direction; what does the house represent, who is the boy, why a cosmonaut, etc? You can run in any number of ways with the narrative, but like the boy, you’re somehow going to find yourself back at the house.

The film is an allegorical exercise, and its ideas and themes are such that, while I have my own interpretations, I’m not going to share them here. I’d much rather you have the opportunity to come up with your own ideas, so I’m going to focus more on the technical. And if the narrative gets your mind spinning, the filmmaking offers equal stimulation.

Visually, the film is incredible. The cinematography is to be commended, and the compositional choices are exceptional. It’s a fine-looking film, to understate its achievement. It captures a feeling of both hope and time lost, while simultaneously offering up a sunny salvation just beyond. Which, knowing suns are stars, brings you right back into the “plant your own star” idea and… debating my own interpretations again.

The House at the Edge of the Galaxy is an exceptional, mentally stimulating short film experience. You and I could see this film multiple times and potentially come away with something different in each viewing, and that is to be applauded. " - Mark Bell

Read more: http://www.filmthreat.com/reviews/70111/#ixzz2sJkB8FzW

D47ccb454c92fb4743dfaae411475d6a?default=https%3a%2f%2fd3uc4wuqnt61m1.cloudfront.net%2fassets%2favatars%2ffemale%2favatar f 0003
filmmaker

Member Reviews (24)

D47ccb454c92fb4743dfaae411475d6a?default=https%3a%2f%2fd3uc4wuqnt61m1.cloudfront.net%2fassets%2favatars%2ffemale%2favatar f 0003
filmmaker

"A young boy (Grayson Sides), nameless, resides alone in a house in the middle of the woods. Unable to escape, as running in any direction only returns him home, the boy sits hopeless. That is, until he meets cosmonaut Yuri (Richard Manichello), who arrives talking about exploring the stars. As the boy questions the activity of chasing down stars based on light given off from a star that may’ve long since died, Yuri gives the boy a “star seed,” and tasks the boy with caring for it. If the boy grows his own star, perhaps it will remove the fear of chasing a light that could result in nothing.

Gleb Osatinski’s The House at the Edge of the Galaxy is the type of short film that inspires discussion and thought long after it ends. Interpretations will vary in almost every direction; what does the house represent, who is the boy, why a cosmonaut, etc? You can run in any number of ways with the narrative, but like the boy, you’re somehow going to find yourself back at the house.

The film is an allegorical exercise, and its ideas and themes are such that, while I have my own interpretations, I’m not going to share them here. I’d much rather you have the opportunity to come up with your own ideas, so I’m going to focus more on the technical. And if the narrative gets your mind spinning, the filmmaking offers equal stimulation.

Visually, the film is incredible. The cinematography is to be commended, and the compositional choices are exceptional. It’s a fine-looking film, to understate its achievement. It captures a feeling of both hope and time lost, while simultaneously offering up a sunny salvation just beyond. Which, knowing suns are stars, brings you right back into the “plant your own star” idea and… debating my own interpretations again.

The House at the Edge of the Galaxy is an exceptional, mentally stimulating short film experience. You and I could see this film multiple times and potentially come away with something different in each viewing, and that is to be applauded. " - Mark Bell

Read more: http://www.filmthreat.com/reviews/70111/#ixzz2sJkB8FzW

4 members like this review
6867ba20772ea74f5f2b2a4b5de54246?default=https%3a%2f%2fd3uc4wuqnt61m1.cloudfront.net%2fassets%2favatars%2fmale%2favatar m 0076
top reviewer

Pensive, compelling and emotionally charged. Beautifully shot.

3 members like this review
94572.small
top reviewer

(NOTE: SPOILER.) European pacing, nicely filmed, very subdued. Best as seen as some form of fable, but I am surprised Yuri didn't cut the fruit in half horizontally. It *was* a tree of stars, if looked at in this way.

2 members like this review

Some nice compositions. I think the cinematography is its strongest element. The editing is purposeful as well, moving the audience through this meandering mood poem. The narrative is allegorical and the acting is mostly ornamental. On the whole, the film is nice, technically sound, sentimental and enjoyable.

2 members like this review

If it was meant to be mysterious, mission accomplished. Nice look, slightly haunting.

2 members like this review
161260.small
top reviewer

Definitely worth the fifteen minutes. It is pure fantasy and fun just for someone to think to make such a creative voyage. don't fasten your seatbelt, or you will look some of the full effect.

1 member likes this review
Picture?width=100&height=100
top reviewer

A beautiful little film. Worth it's weight in apples.

1 member likes this review
D62710d4e018f3c5d7b3e923e2d8e3a4?default=https%3a%2f%2fd3uc4wuqnt61m1.cloudfront.net%2fassets%2favatars%2fmale%2favatar m 0031
top reviewer

a beautiful fable boys usually day dream about a bigger and better life,this boy seems to love the little things,beautiful fable

1 member likes this review

Breathtaking cinematography! Thank you Gleb!

1 member likes this review

Beautifully simple, allegory. Very calm.

1 member likes this review

It makes me sad, but I don't know why. (samwise)

1 member likes this review

nice to look at, a sweet sentiment, although slightly difficult to decipher. the acting....not so good.

1 member likes this review

interesting

1 member likes this review

Excellent message and very good direction.

1 member likes this review

Acting seemed forced ... but an admirable indie effort overall. Tarkovsky is a tough act to follow.

1 member likes this review

Beautiful, sublime.

1 member likes this review

Lovely film that was beautifully made. The storyline was minimal and it would have made for an interesting silent film. Looking forward to more from this compelling director.

1 member likes this review

WHAT POOR ACTING, A MINIMAL SCRIPT AND SUCH A WEAK DELIVERY OF PLOT.....JUST CRAP!

1 member likes this review

yes

1 member likes this review

bleh

1 member likes this review

Rubbish!

Some touching shots, beautiful wooded lit glimpses but blurry in concept. Shabby dialogue.

?im not a genius but seriouly - wtf just happened

poor internet flow - picture stopped and started frequently