Watch the full film on the
Welcome to Fandor. Watch thousands of award-winning films online. ×
Click here to take a look at our newly redesigned movie page.

Sway2006

  • 3.5
SWAY is a free-form documentary edited from fourteen years of daily subway video shooting. It is filled with music and poignant New York City moments.

Copy embed code

×

What makes this film worth watching? See All Reviews

1 member likes this review

I live in the Bay Area, and the underground transportation scene here is very similar to what I see here. Except that this camera keeps looking where most of us would look away. The recording of the iinvasiveness sometimes is uncomfortably edgy, as some real people are being captured when they show their distaste for being taped. However, including that does show a full picture of the reactions, and there are many waves, and fun interactions, too. The camera is neutral, to some degree, but does give more attention to the people who are busking, than to anyone who gives. In this way, it is swaying people toward how cruel it feels to the performers when no one gives. Sometimes people do give, in this movie, but it is always represented as a token.

For it to be really neutral, it would need to also show time in the life of someone who gives. I have never asked for money in that way. But I give many times often times a day as I walk through the town, and it's ever change. I am earn far below minimum wage, and I'm talented, giving, working hard, with very satisfied readers and students, and in poor health, though I live as healthy a lifestyle as I can. I am part of the equation here, and don't feel full represented as far as the economic aspect goes, though in most ways I do. There are people who are giving, and when we can't always give, it's sometimes because we really can't afford it, and we have more going out than coming in.

Obviously, society is imbalanced, and people are asking for a different system than what is in place. It's not working, and I feel was not meant to work, for us.

For some, it is working according to plan. These scenes make silent commentary on the nature of our world, with so may wonders of bizarre events, the odd particular decisions of the editing cuts. For example creatures unfamiliar to me suddenly show up on someone's leg, and begin to mate, and the scene is cut, taking a couple seconds.

I laughed sometimes during this, and cried more often, deeply. I'm very glad to see real life portrayed on film, and though it does sway, it's a positive sway. For people to think about many things, and I wouldn't want to put words in the mouth of the director. Because there is no aggressive message, as much as keen observation, diligence, audacity, a delightful choice of fabulous subjects to pursue to the end of little vignettes.

Wonderful performers here outweigh the number of other patterns, I think, or maybe the unhealthy state of most bodies shown, here. Almost no-one looks balanced, which is understandable, in such an urban existence, in which the ionic balance is always so far off, for example. The electrical and other kinds of pollution including diet are obvious here in a civilization working as far as the mechanics of mass transportation, which is excellent. I'd like to see it happen in ways that are healthier, myself, but it's better than cars. People are daily bringing out the best they can to go traveling somewhere, or asking for money, which seems to be inevitably attached to performing. I'm not sure who would have broken out in dance or song without asking for money. Somehow, it's tolerated with a hat. I'd love to see people just spontaneously singing. These people, some of them, are awe-inspiring, and I'm really hoping this movie helped their careers.

Those who are on different paths don't make themselves as observable, generally. The way they are portrayed in different angles, degrees of obfuscation, speeds and blurs, is lovely film-manship. Looking from above, or at faces as they go by behind the movement of the windows across the tracks, long scenes of characters we come to care for strongly.

I appreciate being able to see this. There are so many wonderfully random scenes with quirky events and characters, caught and delivered to me with edgy grace that is never pretentious, hip, with an attitude, but an eye I can join in with to share the real things he saw in those 14 years.

0e5539172ba77355e79a9db0e1de45b7?default=https%3a%2f%2fd3uc4wuqnt61m1.cloudfront.net%2fassets%2favatars%2fmale%2favatar m 0083
top reviewer

Member Reviews (2)

0e5539172ba77355e79a9db0e1de45b7?default=https%3a%2f%2fd3uc4wuqnt61m1.cloudfront.net%2fassets%2favatars%2fmale%2favatar m 0083
top reviewer

I live in the Bay Area, and the underground transportation scene here is very similar to what I see here. Except that this camera keeps looking where most of us would look away. The recording of the iinvasiveness sometimes is uncomfortably edgy, as some real people are being captured when they show their distaste for being taped. However, including that does show a full picture of the reactions, and there are many waves, and fun interactions, too. The camera is neutral, to some degree, but does give more attention to the people who are busking, than to anyone who gives. In this way, it is swaying people toward how cruel it feels to the performers when no one gives. Sometimes people do give, in this movie, but it is always represented as a token.

For it to be really neutral, it would need to also show time in the life of someone who gives. I have never asked for money in that way. But I give many times often times a day as I walk through the town, and it's ever change. I am earn far below minimum wage, and I'm talented, giving, working hard, with very satisfied readers and students, and in poor health, though I live as healthy a lifestyle as I can. I am part of the equation here, and don't feel full represented as far as the economic aspect goes, though in most ways I do. There are people who are giving, and when we can't always give, it's sometimes because we really can't afford it, and we have more going out than coming in.

Obviously, society is imbalanced, and people are asking for a different system than what is in place. It's not working, and I feel was not meant to work, for us.

For some, it is working according to plan. These scenes make silent commentary on the nature of our world, with so may wonders of bizarre events, the odd particular decisions of the editing cuts. For example creatures unfamiliar to me suddenly show up on someone's leg, and begin to mate, and the scene is cut, taking a couple seconds.

I laughed sometimes during this, and cried more often, deeply. I'm very glad to see real life portrayed on film, and though it does sway, it's a positive sway. For people to think about many things, and I wouldn't want to put words in the mouth of the director. Because there is no aggressive message, as much as keen observation, diligence, audacity, a delightful choice of fabulous subjects to pursue to the end of little vignettes.

Wonderful performers here outweigh the number of other patterns, I think, or maybe the unhealthy state of most bodies shown, here. Almost no-one looks balanced, which is understandable, in such an urban existence, in which the ionic balance is always so far off, for example. The electrical and other kinds of pollution including diet are obvious here in a civilization working as far as the mechanics of mass transportation, which is excellent. I'd like to see it happen in ways that are healthier, myself, but it's better than cars. People are daily bringing out the best they can to go traveling somewhere, or asking for money, which seems to be inevitably attached to performing. I'm not sure who would have broken out in dance or song without asking for money. Somehow, it's tolerated with a hat. I'd love to see people just spontaneously singing. These people, some of them, are awe-inspiring, and I'm really hoping this movie helped their careers.

Those who are on different paths don't make themselves as observable, generally. The way they are portrayed in different angles, degrees of obfuscation, speeds and blurs, is lovely film-manship. Looking from above, or at faces as they go by behind the movement of the windows across the tracks, long scenes of characters we come to care for strongly.

I appreciate being able to see this. There are so many wonderfully random scenes with quirky events and characters, caught and delivered to me with edgy grace that is never pretentious, hip, with an attitude, but an eye I can join in with to share the real things he saw in those 14 years.

1 member likes this review
Picture?width=100&height=100
top reviewer

A film that features such a relentless flow of random combinations of humanity is a bit like taking colored clay and mixing it up until its completely grey. It does not matter that it was once bright blue or red or yellow or that some bits didn't quite mix in and leave tiny dots of vibrant color that catch our eye for a nanosecond. The subway is the great equalizer and the even greater neutralizer, a place where nothing and everything come together to be steamrolled flat. And so it is with this film. Worth watching at times but a bit too much like reading twitters of someones every thought.