Watch the full film on the
Welcome to Fandor. Watch thousands of award-winning films online. ×
Click here to take a look at our newly redesigned movie page.
also known as Stromboli terra di Dio

Stromboli1950

Sorry. This film is not currently available.

  • 3.8
The first collaboration between Roberto Rossellini and Ingrid Bergman is a devastating portrait of a woman's existential crisis, set against the beautiful and forbidding backdrop of a volcanic island. After World War II, a Lithuanian refugee marries a simple Italian fisherman she meets in a prisoner of war camp and accompanies him back to his isolated village on an island off the coast of Sicily. Cut off from the world, she finds herself crumbling emotionally, but she is destined for a dramatic epiphany. Balancing the director's trademark neorealism (exemplified here in a remarkable depiction of the fishermen's lives and work) with deeply felt melodrama, STROMBOLI is a revelation.

What makes this film worth watching? See All Reviews

3 members like this review

World War II displaced many, as wars do. For a time, Europe became a continent of exiles, some of whom had lost everything except their lives. It's for that reason that you can't hate Ingrid Bergman as a Lithuanian widow in postwar Italy who marries some schmoe she barely knows for a chance to escape. His home on a remote island sounds nice. Turns out the place is more shabby than she thought, she's out-of-step with the culture and, oh yeah, there's a volcano there that likes to go off sometimes and destroy everyone's homes. Its inhabitants are stalwarts, elderly people who've learned to live with lava. Ingrid Bergman has nothing in common with them. And that's what this stark and powerful film is partly about. Director Roberto Rossellini shoots this in raw Neorealism style, with documentary-like views of island life.There's a shadow of politics here, but the human story matters most. There are lots of ways to be lost. Being a war refugee is only one of them, but in Italy 1950 it was the most relevant one.

33856.small
top reviewer

Member Reviews (6)

33856.small
top reviewer

World War II displaced many, as wars do. For a time, Europe became a continent of exiles, some of whom had lost everything except their lives. It's for that reason that you can't hate Ingrid Bergman as a Lithuanian widow in postwar Italy who marries some schmoe she barely knows for a chance to escape. His home on a remote island sounds nice. Turns out the place is more shabby than she thought, she's out-of-step with the culture and, oh yeah, there's a volcano there that likes to go off sometimes and destroy everyone's homes. Its inhabitants are stalwarts, elderly people who've learned to live with lava. Ingrid Bergman has nothing in common with them. And that's what this stark and powerful film is partly about. Director Roberto Rossellini shoots this in raw Neorealism style, with documentary-like views of island life.There's a shadow of politics here, but the human story matters most. There are lots of ways to be lost. Being a war refugee is only one of them, but in Italy 1950 it was the most relevant one.

3 members like this review

The Italian Realism was shocking. It tackled post WWII displacement, poverty, subordination of women, cultural bias, marriage between strangers, and an active volcanic island. I'm impressed by Rossellini's work and the wonderful Ingrid Bergman.

2 members like this review

I don't think any film pre-1970 has blown my mind as much as this one. It's so ridiculously, impossibly dark. When you consider the real-life drama surrounding the film and what would end up happening to the love affair between Rossellini and Bergman (they had a child together while they were both married to other people; he eloped with another woman after seven years of marriage to Bergman), this film becomes so haunting to watch. It ends at the height of her despair, while almost all other movies would have an entire 25-minute act following such a low point. The setting is so desolate and the visuals are beautiful.

1 member likes this review

Fascinating female character given the time, and I'm a sucker for the setting playing as a metaphor.

1 member likes this review

I've always found Ingrid Bergman fascinating to watch, one of first actors from a previous era I actually found absorbing. She's beautiful, interesting, a quick and open smile that lights up her being, yet navigates through films with an unapologetic deep consideration of things. Clearly smart and like a real person/woman, and never plays at acting "feminine." There's a powerful sexuality in that. I think this film does a good job portraying the compromises made by those recovering from and displaced by war. Compromises that are pragmatic and not based on anything manipulative or dishonest, or fatalistic, or even blindly hopeful--but made by people trying to get through. Who would think an isolated sun-drenched Italian island with a volcano could be so horribly desolate? The roughness of the pumice stone everywhere, nowhere to go. Bergman can barely get out of the maze of her housing compound. Or the isolation of an intelligent woman of some experience married to a young man who loves her, yet is simple and reactive. This film illustrates what it took me a long time to learn--that women in films of previous eras (including silents) can be much more interesting, relatable, and INTIMATEly drawn than...those of standard rom/coms of the 90s, the flat "girlfriend' roles portrayed in the 70s, or even more romanticized Hollywood affairs. Such a sense of intimacy with a character takes *time*, unrushed, and this film gives viewers and Bergman all the time needed to convey her small daily efforts & growing desperation, incredible longing for life, living, unavailable to her here. Hers is no passive sadness but a perpetually fueled state of problem solving. Interesting we are introduced to her as such a likable character, and get to see her real human turn when faced with (what to her is) a suddenly desperate situation. She continues to be likable enough, but probably no longer thinks of herself as such. Film ends abruptly, there's no "wrapping up" of her real and scary quest, but perhaps the film (and life) is more realistic in this approach. (Also great detailed depiction of Italian island fishing culture, the immigrant experience and those hoping for opportunity elsewhere through hard work).

Good film with alot of good special effects and people spirit with each other.