Watch the full film on the
Welcome to Fandor. Watch thousands of award-winning films online. ×
Click here to take a look at our newly redesigned movie page.

Soft in the Head2013

  • 3.6
  • passes the bechdel test
Thrown out of her New York City apartment, Natalia, a twenty-five year old hot mess, relies on the kindness of friends and strangers. Seemingly unaware of the havoc she wreaks, she skips from one place to another, including her best friend's, where she crashes a holiday meal and seduces the best friend's socially inept brother. Natalia ends up staying at a shelter run by genuinely good Maury, who takes an interest in making her life better, but life is not that simple, and tragedy ensues. With a menagerie of New York characters, set against the backdrop of a homeless shelter, a religious household and the cacophonous streets of New York, SOFT IN THE HEAD is a look at how easy it is to lose one's head in the big city, particularly for those already lost.

Copy embed code

×

What makes this film worth watching? See All Reviews

2 members like this review

Nathan Silver's SOFT IN THE HEAD is an uncompromising character study on the brutality of emotional manipulation, boredom, and deception.

Natalia is a borderline sociopathic youth who has seemingly zero remorse for the people and destruction left in her wake of chaos. The film opens in the middle of a soon to turn violent breakup between our protagonist and her abusive boyfriend. But Natalia is not without fault. She smiles, touches and grins her way through the feud, and we can tell that her boyfriend has seen this charade many times before. He knocks off her wig and a physical altercation ensues.

Natalia spends the rest of the film playing victim and pulling on the heart strings of friends and good samaritans in order to get attention, comfort, but most of all, an emotional reaction. Yet, her unhinged persona is not beyond empathy. One can imagine years of psychological abuse and parental neglect in the years leading up to our glimpse into this character's life. Her malice is often subtle and/or desperate, so we (and everyone she comes into contact with) want to forgive her as she smiles and flashes her eyes.

Boredom and loneliness are Natalia's worst enemy. In a particular scene, Natalia is left in her friend's house alone. She gets drunks, toys with her necklace, and stares off into space -- clearly agitated by being left alone with her own thoughts. Her friend's socially inept little brother comes home and Natalia immediately takes advantage of his awkward crush. She feeds his affection with doses of heavy flirtation, while remaining distant herself, feeding off his gaze. This parasitic behavior is the template for most of her interactions with the world, which ultimately result in the exploitation of the other -- whether it be a friend, stranger, or caretaker.

While lacking a structured story arc (as is to be expected with Silver's work), the film has a cohesive chronology that plays out over dinner scene after dinner scene. Almost every interaction between two or more characters takes place over a meal or a drink -- and if not, they're seated at a table nonetheless. Silver and his crew understand the potential for disaster when mixed company interact in a kitchen or dining room. A place meant for family values, prayer, and domestic activity, Silver transforms the dinner table into an emotional battlefield, dropping two nuclear warheads in a breathtaking double climax.

Member Reviews (9)

Nathan Silver's SOFT IN THE HEAD is an uncompromising character study on the brutality of emotional manipulation, boredom, and deception.

Natalia is a borderline sociopathic youth who has seemingly zero remorse for the people and destruction left in her wake of chaos. The film opens in the middle of a soon to turn violent breakup between our protagonist and her abusive boyfriend. But Natalia is not without fault. She smiles, touches and grins her way through the feud, and we can tell that her boyfriend has seen this charade many times before. He knocks off her wig and a physical altercation ensues.

Natalia spends the rest of the film playing victim and pulling on the heart strings of friends and good samaritans in order to get attention, comfort, but most of all, an emotional reaction. Yet, her unhinged persona is not beyond empathy. One can imagine years of psychological abuse and parental neglect in the years leading up to our glimpse into this character's life. Her malice is often subtle and/or desperate, so we (and everyone she comes into contact with) want to forgive her as she smiles and flashes her eyes.

Boredom and loneliness are Natalia's worst enemy. In a particular scene, Natalia is left in her friend's house alone. She gets drunks, toys with her necklace, and stares off into space -- clearly agitated by being left alone with her own thoughts. Her friend's socially inept little brother comes home and Natalia immediately takes advantage of his awkward crush. She feeds his affection with doses of heavy flirtation, while remaining distant herself, feeding off his gaze. This parasitic behavior is the template for most of her interactions with the world, which ultimately result in the exploitation of the other -- whether it be a friend, stranger, or caretaker.

While lacking a structured story arc (as is to be expected with Silver's work), the film has a cohesive chronology that plays out over dinner scene after dinner scene. Almost every interaction between two or more characters takes place over a meal or a drink -- and if not, they're seated at a table nonetheless. Silver and his crew understand the potential for disaster when mixed company interact in a kitchen or dining room. A place meant for family values, prayer, and domestic activity, Silver transforms the dinner table into an emotional battlefield, dropping two nuclear warheads in a breathtaking double climax.

2 members like this review
Picture?width=100&height=100
top reviewer

Did not much care for this movie at all. I think it was probably the worst movie I watched on Fandor

1 member likes this review
243496.small
top reviewer

Nathan Silver creates a fully realized chaotic, messy and unpredictable world that all but comes totally unhinged. He approaches his two primary characters with such steadfast commitment that lack of narrative focus actually ends up being an asset. A valuable cinematic voice.

The movie is reminiscent of a 1970's rambling experimental film. An unexpected and riveting study of madness that is only silenced when the film ends.

D62710d4e018f3c5d7b3e923e2d8e3a4?default=https%3a%2f%2fd3uc4wuqnt61m1.cloudfront.net%2fassets%2favatars%2fmale%2favatar m 0031
top reviewer

she crashes an orthodox jewish home eating potato chips and drinking her bottle of wine lots of overkill,poor teenage kid has a mad crush on her father is going crazy,she is not a jew so the entire family is in an uproar poor kid is crazy for he andis struggling with his orthodox life and his desire not to hurt his parents very much of overkill sad story did not care for it

Intensely Dysfunctional

Intense, troubling, intriguing.

A great movie. fun and light. optimistic an inspiring.

Great date movie.

gimme back my hat

I would say this movie is simply misplaced. It is not a comedy although one actor is rather humorous until the character is too much an obvious W. Allen impersonation. Also, I noted only one black character in the whole movie, so I wouldn’t label it as a black comedy. It’s got a bit of Jewish ritual in it, but o/w a movie about everyday living amongst the twenty something generation here in the USA…

I liked it enough to watch from beginning to end.