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Slacker1991

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  • 4.1
  • passes the bechdel test
Richard Linklater's independent classic SLACKER presents a day in the life in Austin, Texas, among its social outcasts and misfits (predominantly the twenty-something set) using a series of linear vignettes. These characters who, in some manner, just don't fit into the establishment norms move seamlessly from one scene to the next, randomly coming and going into one another's lives. Highlights include a UFO buff who adamantly insists that the U.S. has been on the moon since the 1950s, a woman who produces a glass slide purportedly of Madonna's pap smear and an old anarchist who sympathetically shares his philosophy of life with a robber.

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"...a movie with an appeal almost impossible to describe." - Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times


4 members like this review

No movie sums up the pothead, coffee-drinking, shaggy-haired, everybody's-an-artist vibe of Austin, Texas like SLACKER. It's a seminal independent film of its time, the EASY RIDER of the 90s. It's entertaining and artsy. Simple and inscrutable. Funny and philosophizing. There's no plot. We hang out with one character for a few minutes and then someone else passes through and the movie follows them for awhile until someone else walks by, and so on. Some characters get five minutes, some get thirty seconds--and everybody's talk-talk-talkin' their heads off. About the nature of reality. About JFK conspiracies. About anarchy. About their band. About Madonna's pap smear. They converse, they spout monologues to interested people, they rant to disinterested people and when no one's around, they talk to themselves... and then there's the guy with a PA system mounted on his car. University of Texas students, schizophrenics and lackadaisical artist types mix together here until you can barely tell the difference.

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Member Reviews (15)

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top reviewer

No movie sums up the pothead, coffee-drinking, shaggy-haired, everybody's-an-artist vibe of Austin, Texas like SLACKER. It's a seminal independent film of its time, the EASY RIDER of the 90s. It's entertaining and artsy. Simple and inscrutable. Funny and philosophizing. There's no plot. We hang out with one character for a few minutes and then someone else passes through and the movie follows them for awhile until someone else walks by, and so on. Some characters get five minutes, some get thirty seconds--and everybody's talk-talk-talkin' their heads off. About the nature of reality. About JFK conspiracies. About anarchy. About their band. About Madonna's pap smear. They converse, they spout monologues to interested people, they rant to disinterested people and when no one's around, they talk to themselves... and then there's the guy with a PA system mounted on his car. University of Texas students, schizophrenics and lackadaisical artist types mix together here until you can barely tell the difference.

4 members like this review
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top reviewer

Watching this for the third or fourth time, different things are starting to catch my attention. I love the way he handles the transitions between characters -- some scenes take only a few seconds, others are longer, but some of my favorite moments in the film are the "handoffs".

3 members like this review

never been to austin, so can't comment on the relationship of the film to the city. the film is a trip down the time tunnel to the years just prior to the computer revolution, however, and for me today, that is it's primary virtue. are you old enough to remember hanging out? just hanging out. creating your own entertainment. pay phones, answering machines. book stores, newspapers. empty space and time. pre-gentrification of everything. hitchhiking. excellent vintage cars, too.

2 members like this review
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I admired "Slacker," and here's my review: http://bit.ly/K3QUZh

1 member likes this review

Such an engrossing film. All of the people are interesting and lovable for all of their quirks. If you haven't seen this modern classic from one of the living greats, do yourself a favor and watch it!

1 member likes this review

I've never been to Austin, but I get the vibe portrayed. A bit similar to what I experienced during the 90's. I think I'll miss the Pre-iPhone era.

1 member likes this review

I think all of us, if we have any self-awareness whatsoever, are bound to see something of ourselves reflected in "Slacker." It's an entrancing film featuring a motley parade of armchair intellectuals and lonely pundits, all convinced that their esoteric passions can - will - change the world. Linklater gives them each the spotlight, not to poke fun, but out of respect for the Slacker ethos; in his eyes, those who are committed to their ideas and ideologies rather than building their careers and relationships aren't lazy - they're responsible, even admirable. Perhaps he's wrong, but it's certainly a charming, funny movie, and one of my favorites.

1 member likes this review

Film critic Pauline Kael famously stated, "When we championed trash culture we had no idea it would become the only culture."

The meandering narrative structure of Richard Linklater's "Slacker" - not unlike Robert Altman's "Nashville" - feature autodidacts who inhabit a world of what Kael calls "trash culture." It is the "only culture." Linklater's lens is a loving look with hints of parody rather than straight-up exploitation. The director's own cameo appearance makes us all feel we should want to belong to his world if we don't already.

1 member likes this review
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nonstop brilliant film_everything is go

So many conspiracy theorists, so little time.

I can remember what my 16-year-old self was excited about with this roving, meandering milestone but my 37-year-old self is disappointed by the veritable cavalcade of male blowhards talking shit and doing little else.

Wow. A wonderful slice of a day in the life of a middle American town in the 90s. Don't get to attached to a character, as you may never meet him or her again in this film. The camera is a fly on the wall, where you, the audience, get to sit and watch mundane events take place. Yet they are so fascinating. Reality TV stands as testament to our innate desire to peer into others lives and simply hang out, somewhat a slacker-esque form of a peeping tom.

The grand-daddy of the indie film revival of the 90s. Sheer brilliance. Linklater at his finest, truly incapsulating what the weirdo outsider subculture is like.

A hundred minute rant on the state of society, or a collection of misfits and outcasts espousing on the issues most dear to them? As I watched, I wondered what would become of these characters if their lives were to be followed. Most were young, so would they someday leave behind the idealism, enthusiasm and, often, distorted views they held? Or were the few older characters in the film indicators of what they might later be? No matter what the intent, the ending, as I saw it, was a summary of life itself. Like waiting for Godot, and I suppose many pieces of provocative art, this film keeps you guessing and thinking.

This film is a "chef d'oeuvre"! I love how linklater opens the movie with his personal monologue in the cab talking about reality and dreams, and establishing the origin of thought as the fundamental element to the nature of reality. There is a french expression that says "la réalité c'est le rêve des autres", reality is the dreams of others. All the characters in this film are demonstrating how to own taste and create unique esthetics. Individuation can't be watered down to something bought in a supermarket. It has to be chaotic! And that's why they are beautiful losers! And they are two choices left, kill your mother because all problems come from your family tree or honor the prostitute, get drunk, make a movie, and it will all make sense later.