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Seytan1974

  • 3.0
Forget the notion of remakes, sequels, prequels, extended scenes and modified versions of movies; the Turkish motion picture industry has been making their own versions of American movies for years. After the worldwide success of William Friedkin's 1973 classic film THE EXORCIST, those wacky Turks decided that maybe they should steal the script and make their own homegrown version of the film. The result is SEYTAN, a one-of-a-kind viewing experience. If you've seen the 1973 original you'll feel you're experiencing déjà vu as this version is almost an identical scene by scene remake of THE EXORCIST, albeit with a Turkish soundtrack, music recorded directly off a record player, editing most likely done by a blind monkey and special effects more fitting for an elementary school play. Combine this with really grainy film stock, some out of work (possibly homeless) unknown Turkish actors, horrible direction and a budget of about $1.95 and you've got yourself an instant classic!

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5 members like this review

Before Sweding was a thing, or a name for that thing, filmmakers were making blatant rip offs of popular American films. SEYTAN is not the first copied film from Turkey, though "Turksploitation" seems to have begun in the 60s, but it's one of the more famous of their output. How they didn't get sued by Warner Brothers, or Mike Oldfield at least for the unauthorized use of "Tubular Bells" is a mystery to me.

We all know the story of THE EXORCIST: an innocent young woman is used as a pawn by the Devil to cause the adults around her to question themselves, their faith, and God's love. The main changes between this film and the American classic is that the majority of people in Turkey are Muslim. Instead of using the film to examine questions of faith in Islam (though I suppose it tries by having a disbeliever - Tugrul as the Father Karras character - who's written the book on demonic possession as a problem of the mentally unstable learn that Seytan truly exists), it's a hamfisted adaptation of an intrinsically Catholic / Christian plot. In that respect, I found the film to be disappointing.

That said, however, I also found the film to be immensely entertaining and fascinating in terms of how these particular filmmakers saw THE EXORCIST and tried to adapt it for their particular market.

A special shout out must be given to the translator/s who must've been told that they weren't allowed to translate and interpret the dialogue and sort of gave up about a quarter of the way through the film and gave us a literal translation. Their notes, particularly during Tugrul's initial interview with Seytan, are (almost) worth the price of admission.

A casual viewer may find the film boring, but film fans and fans of cinematic curiosities as well as students of cultural differences will find themselves a bit of a treasure in SEYTAN.

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top reviewer
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Member Reviews (6)

483a12bbc21a4145a4c2aa6bb3ccfaf8?default=https%3a%2f%2fd3uc4wuqnt61m1.cloudfront.net%2fassets%2favatars%2fmale%2favatar m 0094
top reviewer

Before Sweding was a thing, or a name for that thing, filmmakers were making blatant rip offs of popular American films. SEYTAN is not the first copied film from Turkey, though "Turksploitation" seems to have begun in the 60s, but it's one of the more famous of their output. How they didn't get sued by Warner Brothers, or Mike Oldfield at least for the unauthorized use of "Tubular Bells" is a mystery to me.

We all know the story of THE EXORCIST: an innocent young woman is used as a pawn by the Devil to cause the adults around her to question themselves, their faith, and God's love. The main changes between this film and the American classic is that the majority of people in Turkey are Muslim. Instead of using the film to examine questions of faith in Islam (though I suppose it tries by having a disbeliever - Tugrul as the Father Karras character - who's written the book on demonic possession as a problem of the mentally unstable learn that Seytan truly exists), it's a hamfisted adaptation of an intrinsically Catholic / Christian plot. In that respect, I found the film to be disappointing.

That said, however, I also found the film to be immensely entertaining and fascinating in terms of how these particular filmmakers saw THE EXORCIST and tried to adapt it for their particular market.

A special shout out must be given to the translator/s who must've been told that they weren't allowed to translate and interpret the dialogue and sort of gave up about a quarter of the way through the film and gave us a literal translation. Their notes, particularly during Tugrul's initial interview with Seytan, are (almost) worth the price of admission.

A casual viewer may find the film boring, but film fans and fans of cinematic curiosities as well as students of cultural differences will find themselves a bit of a treasure in SEYTAN.

5 members like this review

Still shocked that no one was sued....I watched for all of the details especially about how they would treat the Bible. Interesting. Even those bells were the same.

A film that has to be seen to be believed! If you had ever seen The Exorcist then you have seen this film. The film's description does not do this film it's due! The only change in this film is to reflect Turkey's Muslim faith. Trust me! Grab your family, friends, and people off the street to see it!

I did not get to see all of it so I can not rate it!!! it stopped playing part of the way through so i switch back to my DishTV

This movie annoyed me.

Hilarious!!