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Réponse de femmes1975

  • 4.0
1975: the "Year of the Woman." A television station gives seven female filmmakers seven minutes to answer the question "What does it mean to be a woman?" Agnès Varda answers with the cine-tract, ("Our Body: Our Sex"). Women talking about sex, desire, commercials and children (whether to have them or not.) Viewers wrote in to complain about a naked pregnant woman, dancing and roaring with laughter.

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6 members like this review

this is the most beautiful piece of didactic cinema I've ever seen, what's more is that its message seems convincing. in fact, made in 75, and closing with "to be continued..." we can actually place ourselves perfectly with that time and piece by piece, so to speak, appreciate the experience of the progress of the ... plot... as it were. very touching, the insights for the other sex, and for the subject sex of the film certainly? this is really one big bad wow. totally unforseen, any possible vague expectations wildly exceeded. I found myself curious to look at the clock from time to time wondering how I'm oriented to it very well in the midst of all the surprises, visual, the ideas, the ... wonderful tone resulting from the use of the ... first person by all these different women, 'unique and not the same'.

is it possible that in 75 the material here might resemble some kinda "second wave" or whatever, a later form of .... what ends up serving as a blanket doctrine at any given time. I don't know whether this movie is a bit ahead of the curve or not, really, but one feels that it's,,, of course beyond that more grounded in ... woman's experience. are we now at a point when some women would say, 'but I enjoy showing my legs to the client'? I wonder. Some would question whether a woman need be born a woman. To be precise the line might stay but the image of a biological female babe might need be handled differently, no crotch shot.

Brava Varda!!

E74c44940ab813caecf0eabaea0e59b6?default=https%3a%2f%2fd3uc4wuqnt61m1.cloudfront.net%2fassets%2favatars%2ffemale%2favatar f 0027
top reviewer

Member Reviews (12)

E74c44940ab813caecf0eabaea0e59b6?default=https%3a%2f%2fd3uc4wuqnt61m1.cloudfront.net%2fassets%2favatars%2ffemale%2favatar f 0027
top reviewer

this is the most beautiful piece of didactic cinema I've ever seen, what's more is that its message seems convincing. in fact, made in 75, and closing with "to be continued..." we can actually place ourselves perfectly with that time and piece by piece, so to speak, appreciate the experience of the progress of the ... plot... as it were. very touching, the insights for the other sex, and for the subject sex of the film certainly? this is really one big bad wow. totally unforseen, any possible vague expectations wildly exceeded. I found myself curious to look at the clock from time to time wondering how I'm oriented to it very well in the midst of all the surprises, visual, the ideas, the ... wonderful tone resulting from the use of the ... first person by all these different women, 'unique and not the same'.

is it possible that in 75 the material here might resemble some kinda "second wave" or whatever, a later form of .... what ends up serving as a blanket doctrine at any given time. I don't know whether this movie is a bit ahead of the curve or not, really, but one feels that it's,,, of course beyond that more grounded in ... woman's experience. are we now at a point when some women would say, 'but I enjoy showing my legs to the client'? I wonder. Some would question whether a woman need be born a woman. To be precise the line might stay but the image of a biological female babe might need be handled differently, no crotch shot.

Brava Varda!!

6 members like this review

Still relevant in 2012! Loved it!

2 members like this review
2e96eff8174b408fe68458c53c86b24b?default=https%3a%2f%2fd3uc4wuqnt61m1.cloudfront.net%2fassets%2favatars%2ffemale%2favatar f 0025
top reviewer

What do women want? We often ask the question with a puzzled look on our faces. Listen to this film: women want to be reinvented. Or more likely, they want to be themselves as they are and not distorted by a culture that displays them as objects. One phrase stays with me: "Every time I see a naked woman (in advertising media), I feel they are looking at me." So who is that culture that blithely and ignorantly degrade and embarrass women? The enemy is us. I smiled a bit while watching this film and nodded my head a lot. Message received!

1 member likes this review

Sweet and innocent, so direct. Staged and scripted, sometimes awkward. A 1975 document of how (some) women in France felt.

1 member likes this review

I find it funny it was censored when speaking about sex exploitation in the media but all of the nudity was fine. I can still see today what these women were fighting for in France. Topless women everywhere on billboards but I wear a shirt that is considered decent in the states & I get stared down & harassed! My host mom's response? "What do you expect? Men can't help themselves!" Thank God my country is a bit more progressive! I hope women make further strides soon in France.

1 member likes this review

Amazing, but so depressing that Varda made it in 1975--not much has changed and so much has gotten worse.

1 member likes this review
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Agnes Varda is great! When we speak of the "Nouvelle Vague", she needs to be included, not just the men. La Pointe Courte (1954) was the first "Nouvelle Vague" film! All of her films are either very good, or superb.

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Powerful!

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top reviewer

One of the great feminist films in history. Amazing stuff.

Writer seems to be fixed on women as physical objects (mylady, thou dust protest too much). As if that was the only problem women have in this or any age. What about the 'glass ceiling, inequality of salaries, lack of sports funding, etc.etc. etc. Unfortunate the producer could not continue the conversation.

Here is a film that the DNC should show as part of presenting the brilliant women who have taken their stage this week. Thank you Agnès Varda!

Agnes is really one of a kind. I've always loved how she blends feminism/equality into all her work.