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Orange2003

  • 3.7
ORANGE is inspired by the direct film (cameraless) tradition. This tradition includes works in which the filmstrip is directly manipulated by painting, scratching, or otherwise placing objects on it. This tradition was probably originated by Len Lye in his hand painted A COLOUR BOX from 1935. To create his piece, Gregg Biermann cut up an orange into several pieces and scanned the pieces into his computer. He then took the image files of the orange pieces and “pasted” them directly into the video strip using a photo editing software package. This technique then transforms the orange pieces into what appears to be a random exploding jumble of images when viewed.

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This film is a response to the filmmaking techniques of Stan Brakhage, especially his 1963 short "Mothlight." Like Brakhage, Biermann seems to be concerned with the materiality of the filmmaking process. Of course, what does "materiality" mean in the digital world? The digital world doesn't really leave us with discrete frames the way that film does. Biermann seems to overcome this problem by using photographic images from his scanner to replicate the feel of film. ORANGE is an interesting exercise, a blend of analog and digital with neither canceling the other out.

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Member Reviews (1)

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top reviewer

This film is a response to the filmmaking techniques of Stan Brakhage, especially his 1963 short "Mothlight." Like Brakhage, Biermann seems to be concerned with the materiality of the filmmaking process. Of course, what does "materiality" mean in the digital world? The digital world doesn't really leave us with discrete frames the way that film does. Biermann seems to overcome this problem by using photographic images from his scanner to replicate the feel of film. ORANGE is an interesting exercise, a blend of analog and digital with neither canceling the other out.

1 member likes this review