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also known as The Birth

O parto2014

  • 3.8
Teargas, sirens of police cars and ambulances, masked demonstrators who throw stones, military police attacking on horseback - the streets of Rio de Janeiro are on fire as anger erupts over corrupt politicians, insufficient schooling, mass unemployment, lack of basic needs such as health care. In the midst of this, filmmaker Elizabeth Salgado is filming on her way to the hospital. She is pregnant and needs a check up. Elizabeth is convinced that her health insurance should provide a "natural birth" if she chooses so. But after entering the hospital, it is clear that the clock of the insurance industry is ticking. Without much further ado, the doctors decide for a Caesarian. Elizabeth has the choice: either leave for another hospital or give birth right away... The first thing she decides is to keep on filming. Between 80 and 90% of all women in Brazil have a Caesarian to give birth, one of the highest percentages in the world. According to the World Health Organization 15% is already too much. But in Brazil this seems the only way; especially the poorer women who lack sufficient health insurance do not have a choice. A Caesarian is quicker and therefore cost-effective. O PARTO is a remarkable film and a highly personal account of life in modern day Brazil.

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1 member likes this review

Astounding, and powerful -- and an amazing connection between the outrage throughout the general population on all basic living conditions against the inhumane punishment of women and their babies in a systemic, corporatization of basic human health access. Giving birth is not a condition, nor an illness. It's a part of life, and how we all got here.

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top reviewer

Member Reviews (2)

180311.small
top reviewer

Astounding, and powerful -- and an amazing connection between the outrage throughout the general population on all basic living conditions against the inhumane punishment of women and their babies in a systemic, corporatization of basic human health access. Giving birth is not a condition, nor an illness. It's a part of life, and how we all got here.

1 member likes this review
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top reviewer

This film presents a rather dismal picture of Brazil--and not a place you would seek out to have a baby. I am not sure what the underlying motives for this film are, but it is short and worth watching.