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Meditate and Destroy2007

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  • 3.8
MEDITATE AND DESTROY profiles the persona who quite possibly represents America’s most unexpected Buddhist: former punk rocker and juvenile delinquent Noah Levine, bestselling author of the book "Dharma Punx." As a teenager, Levine was mired in an abyss of violence, drug and alcohol abuse and criminal detention. When he hit bottom, attempting suicide in juvenile jail in the late 1980s, Levine received a phone call from his father who instructed him how to take baby steps toward initiating meditation practice. Knowing that he either needed to die or to change, Levine tested meditation and felt a glimmer of freedom from his intense suffering. Today, Levine is a respected teacher and figure in what is perhaps the most unconventional Buddhist community in the country: the “Dpunx Nation.” Staking claim to his egalitarian urban vision, Levine states that “Buddhism is not just for hippies anymore” as he reaches out to a new generation of youths who are turning to meditation as they seek a departure from their lives of drugs, violence and crime. In major cities throughout America, these unlikely Buddhists find comfort and affinity in Levine’s approach. Today, New York, Hollywood, Philadelphia, Seattle, San Francisco, Boulder, Portland and Washington, D.C., all host regular Dharma Punx-inspired meditation groups that allow punks to develop their own awareness on a deep level while retaining their edge and individuality.

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1 member likes this review

It's good to get a new perspective on something you think you probably know pretty well. Noah Levine brings his own unique but at the same time very familiar perspective to mindfulness and meditation and survival.

Member Reviews (4)

It's good to get a new perspective on something you think you probably know pretty well. Noah Levine brings his own unique but at the same time very familiar perspective to mindfulness and meditation and survival.

1 member likes this review

I've seen this film twice now. Once years ago in a community screening and once online. The first time I saw it, I felt it might be a bit difficult to follow in a traditional doc sense, but upon the second viewing, I realized that was Fisher had done was to create her film's structure around The Four Noble Truths. Very clever...

Truly enhances the idea of Buddhist dharma for a western audience, and a pretty good "ain't goin' back to that place again" story.

better than i expected