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Light Work I2006

  • 4.2
LIGHT WORK I is a haunting and impressionistic video that connects the industrial and medical transformations of the last century with the present day digital revolutions in music and movies and the implied demise of 16mm film. LIGHT WORK I sprung out of the immersive expanded cinema performance "Light Work Mood Disorder" created by collaborators Jennifer Reeves and composer Anthony Burr. In LIGHT WORK I, Reeves recorded the process of making the direct-on-16mm-film for "Light Work Mood Disorder" with High Definition macro shooting and composited this magnified documentation with shots from the original performance film. The soundtrack is a layered mix of multi-tonal bass clarinet, organ, electronics and sine waves, creating a musical composition out of both “real world” analog instruments and the invisible digital realm. Symbols of 20th century science, industry, medicine and madness are mixed in rhythmic molecular forms, morphing frequencies and colorful visual textures. Educational films (depicting factory assembly lines, X-rays, scientific experiments, etc.) are sewn together on a sewing machine and covered with melted down pharmaceuticals affixed to the film. Direct-on-film techniques converge with the latest HD format "destined to render film obsolete." Formats compete for dominance and resolve to coexist, perhaps in a fantasy world.

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2 members like this review

Such an incredible essay on the haunting presence of the inescapably tactile, chemical and moto-industrial nature of the "film stock" medium. An amazingly visceral memory of the medium's life.

Member Reviews (2)

Such an incredible essay on the haunting presence of the inescapably tactile, chemical and moto-industrial nature of the "film stock" medium. An amazingly visceral memory of the medium's life.

2 members like this review
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top reviewer

Is that a concrete image? We ask ourselves that several times while viewing, only to watch it slide and shift into the abstract - an experience that thrills in all senses of the word.

1 member likes this review