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also known as The Death (or Possible Survival) of the Independent Record Store

I Need That Record!2008

  • 3.6
Guerilla filmmaker Brendan Toller unleashes I NEED THAT RECORD!, a tour-de-force tale of greed, media consolidation, homogenized radio, big box stores, downloading and technological shifts in the music industry. Told through candid interviews, crestfallen record store owners, startling statistics and eye-popping animation. Fat cats or our favorite record stores? You decide.

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1 member likes this review

The art direction here parallels our culture's need for art and how records can provide just that - this fun to watch and satisfying film makes even the annoying music geeks into worthy anti heroes and some valuable time is given to rock gods Ian Mackaye and Thurston Moore. Lot's of good contextual info provided concerning the telecommunication Act of 1996 and how corporate music continues to react.

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Member Reviews (6)

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top reviewer

The art direction here parallels our culture's need for art and how records can provide just that - this fun to watch and satisfying film makes even the annoying music geeks into worthy anti heroes and some valuable time is given to rock gods Ian Mackaye and Thurston Moore. Lot's of good contextual info provided concerning the telecommunication Act of 1996 and how corporate music continues to react.

1 member likes this review
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top reviewer

Here is the glory and the tragedy of Pop Culture in the microcosm of a tiny old shop filled with dusty vinyl recordings. This earnest, DIY documentary poses questions. Some will inevitably play the Devil's Advocate and ask "Record Shops? What's the big deal?" But the same question that could be asked of the corner bar, the video arcade, and the neighborhood bookstore. We have become a disenfranchised community, streaming our kicks from the millions of cybermalls out there, while we venture less and less from our respective caves. So maybe the deeper question we need to ask isn't about the local record store, but our isolation as a culture...where can we really go to mix, interact, and simply hang out?

I'd love to see a badly needed update to this. The piano roll/sheet music businesses was blown out of the water by the introduction of the phonograph. The internet sadly killed music as a physical object to collect. But in return gave us an insane amount of music to listen to. But, for me without any relevant packaging. Vinyl is making a nostalgic comeback. Never like it used to be. As for clear channel, now IHeartRadio. They are near bankruptcy. The more things change the more they stay the same.

Succeeds at being both wistful and hopeful...

Vinyl forever!

A great story for the younger people that may have never seen a 45 yet vinyl lp.