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I, Dalio2015

(or the Rules of the Game)

  • 4.0
The great French actor, Marcel Dalio, who has the lead role in Jean Renoir's THE RULES OF THE GAME, also appears in Renoir's GRAND ILLUSION. In both films he plays a character who is Jewish, as Dalio was in real life. In fact, in most of the French films he's in the 1930s, he almost always plays shady characters, informers, blackmailers and gangsters. In other words, he is always "the Jew." When the Nazis invaded France in 1940, he fled to America and appeared in CASABLANCA and TO HAVE AND HAVE NOT. In America, he was no longer the Jew but The Frenchman. He became, in dozens of films, America's idea of a typical Frenchman. His film career has these two strands in which he has two different identities. Are you defined by other people and their perceptions of who you are? Are you always a creation of the way people want to see you? Or can you exist outside of the arbitrary boundaries which are placed on you?

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2 members like this review

This film is a revelation of the power of self-identity. Dalio (Israel Moshe Blauschild), a French actor of Jewish-Romanian descent, navigates institutional prejudices to actualize as a film artist. Despite perpetual, and often successful, attempts to cast him as a cultural stereotype, Dalio retains dignity and powerful skill as a craftsperson throughout his many, often minor, roles. The loving and poetic reconstruction of Blauschild is conveyed through archival photography, film clips, and the fictional persona of Dalio by way of an expressionistic voice over. Rappaport's method is an inspired and imaginative reworking of documentary conventions.

Member Reviews (2)

This film is a revelation of the power of self-identity. Dalio (Israel Moshe Blauschild), a French actor of Jewish-Romanian descent, navigates institutional prejudices to actualize as a film artist. Despite perpetual, and often successful, attempts to cast him as a cultural stereotype, Dalio retains dignity and powerful skill as a craftsperson throughout his many, often minor, roles. The loving and poetic reconstruction of Blauschild is conveyed through archival photography, film clips, and the fictional persona of Dalio by way of an expressionistic voice over. Rappaport's method is an inspired and imaginative reworking of documentary conventions.

2 members like this review

Sublime! And very educational, too.