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Homo Sapiens2016

  • 4.0
A film about the finiteness and fragility of human existence and the end of the industrial age, and what it means to be a human being. What will remain of our lives after we're gone? Empty spaces, ruins, cities increasingly overgrown with vegetation, crumbling asphalt: the areas we currently inhabit, though humanity has disappeared. Now abandoned and decaying, gradually reclaimed by nature after being taken from it so long ago. HOMO SAPIENS is an ode to humanity as seen from a possible future scenario.

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5 members like this review

I'm fascinated by abandoned places and what people leave behind. This documentary takes it one step further and adds some images of the aftermath that humanity has had so far on the earth. Some of the scenes are interesting, some are haunting. Great movie.

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Member Reviews (12)

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top reviewer

I'm fascinated by abandoned places and what people leave behind. This documentary takes it one step further and adds some images of the aftermath that humanity has had so far on the earth. Some of the scenes are interesting, some are haunting. Great movie.

5 members like this review

the best film in fandor. 5 stars.

2 members like this review
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Homo Sapiens begins fittingly with an image of water over a mosaic in what looks to be a Roman bath. Then another part of the mosaic is shown, and then the scene of the dark interior is disclosed from a distance. Much of the film engages us this way – as though taking us through a bending psychomanteum of structure and consciousness, one form and place linked with another. We see architectural spaces giving in to rot and a total absence of human beings, although we continually and wilfully ascribe their presences to the sounds and motions unfolding in these places. These images could be of Chernobyl or an abandoned mining town, the rubble of a bombed city, or, we also suspect, an elegy for our species, here and there stationary shots of locations (giving the impression of surveillance devoid of a human guidance) interpolated with black screens which could be screens of mourning.

Water pervades the first part of this film, in the frame or heard dripping in the distance. The inevitable water of time and erosion. We see many institutional structures, such as prisons, hospitals and theatres, the latter reminding us that the consciousness with which we are viewing the screen is also in slow process of decay. Giant tanks seem at once still threatening and almost farcical in the context of peaceful gull sounds near a lake. Bird sounds are the only animal presence here. But the buildings and machinery indoors and out are alive with sounds which are all too human. A prismatic shaft of light cuts through a building looking fatidic and godly. – All life started, likely, in just such a brilliant shaft of sunlight in water, when some wayward crystals replicated into a form of genetic material. It happened then, and it will happen again. When waves pass through the lattice of an abandoned roller coaster, it seems a potential form of consciousness, as any structure which is resonant with energy.

Towards the end of the film, we see an entire abandoned town half-buried in blowing sand. Haunting shots are taken from interiors looking outward through the frames of windows, all immovably still as in the rest of the film. – Clear that when humanity ends there won’t be any more cinema. The snow comes, burying everything in white, and then its black negative. - A last big fadeout into annihilation.

1 member likes this review

If you enjoy thinking . . .

1 member likes this review

FYI: no dialogue. Beautiful scenes, great ambient sound, surreal urban decay - but that's all it is.

You might like the movie, you might not, but you should know that going in.

Amazing, Beautiful, Melancholic, Evocative. Nature rules over all human created things. The sound design makes this a truly immersive experience.

Surreal.

A first rate cinematic art book. Highly recommended.

Completely astonishing: Is like if men abandonned the Earth leaving its trash, but their spirits are still living there and watching you, even you dont noticced them, they breath and their breathing moves the rests of distroyed laberynths.

Some nice shoots but very aloof and boring. No people or animals just bird noises every now and then.

I skipped through it trying to find something of extended interest, but didn't. All I found were long shots with ambient sound. The scenes in themselves were interesting, but just wasn't sufficiently engaging for a feature length film

weak