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also known as Elle s'appelle Sabine

Her Name is Sabine2007

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  • 4.1
An intelligent, moving and beautiful portrait of Sabine, a 38-year-old autistic woman, filmed by her sister, the famous French actress Sandrine Bonnaire. Through personal footage filmed over a period of twenty-five years, it is revealed that Sabine's growth and many talents were crushed by improper diagnosis and an inadequate care structure. After a tragic five year stay in a psychiatric hospital, Sabine finally finds a new lease on life in a home together with other young people living with similar mental and emotional illnesses. This very intimate film also sends an urgent message to a society that still does not know how to properly take care of its citizens with physical and psychological disabilities.

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"Sandrine Bonnaire makes a touching, educational helming debut—a thoughtful look at her younger sister, whose autism-related behavioral difficulties went undiagnosed for the better part of three decades." - Lisa Nesselson, Variety


3 members like this review

The body language of a woman sitting with arms crossed, legs crossed, is one of reluctance and resentment: doesn't want to be there. Addressing the questions about Sabine's state upon entering the institution, and her state 5 years later, this alleged caretaker comments about Sabine's posture and drooling. No comment about how a once autonomous and functional individual was maltreated, over-medicated, wrongly medicated ... Who knows what. Sabine herself wells up upon seeing her sister's footage of her upon their traveling to New York, the emotional evocation at recognizing who she once was, tells us she is still there deep inside. People with autism, or any mental, psychological condition, whether diagnosed or not, have a right to live life like any living being -- no med can substitute time, attention. A powerful film, ultimately about love. On fandor, I hope to see more of Sandrine Bonnaire, one of my favorites, behind and in front of the camera, old and new work, she finds a way to communicate eloquently, the truth.

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top reviewer

Member Reviews (9)

180311.small
top reviewer

The body language of a woman sitting with arms crossed, legs crossed, is one of reluctance and resentment: doesn't want to be there. Addressing the questions about Sabine's state upon entering the institution, and her state 5 years later, this alleged caretaker comments about Sabine's posture and drooling. No comment about how a once autonomous and functional individual was maltreated, over-medicated, wrongly medicated ... Who knows what. Sabine herself wells up upon seeing her sister's footage of her upon their traveling to New York, the emotional evocation at recognizing who she once was, tells us she is still there deep inside. People with autism, or any mental, psychological condition, whether diagnosed or not, have a right to live life like any living being -- no med can substitute time, attention. A powerful film, ultimately about love. On fandor, I hope to see more of Sandrine Bonnaire, one of my favorites, behind and in front of the camera, old and new work, she finds a way to communicate eloquently, the truth.

3 members like this review
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top reviewer

Riveting documentary by French actress Sandrine Bonnaire chronicling the decline of her autistic sister after 5 years of psychiatric "treatment" in an institution and the eventual placement of Sabine in a nurturing group home. A testament to the power of sisterly love (we learn that it is Sandrine who is pivotal in obtaining funding for this home). Both an indictmentof old-school pysch wards and an argument for the individual attention and support that smaller-scale settings and family participation have to offer people living with mental illness and/or developmental disabilities.

1 member likes this review

I bet you don't want your heart to be broken, but this film will do it, even if you don't. But in the end it's a good thing – it reinforces the fragility of the mind and the compassion of those who care.

a beautiful and deep film

Another example of toxic psychiatry. A beautiful, young, talented woman appears to be lobotomized, either physically, or chemically, or both, by an institution.

Well, I'm mentally ill too. I recognize the way the pre damage looks in this film. Its why I got to meet Bob Dylan, its why I get human sacrifices in the media and I was a beauty also, people loved to watch me dance and I went all over the country trying to help Bob and The Jewish nation smile and gain power. I figured it out though, and now its easy to want to spit and hit. Thankfully I can keep it together better than that and though some superstars still stop by on the sly and the list of religious orgnaizations send their brightest stars to my house for obliteration on holidays and Jack Frost Blizzard events where you shoulda kept your mouth shut about charlie brown goddess retard. You don't get baptized when you are like me except the shame came through a little more forcefully. This girl will probably never go through the "Can't you help anybody?" phase of non-motherhood but now she'a a star all exposed and preyed upon or prayed upon its so hard to tell the difference.

This is a wonderful documentary.

One day, "no resident will say, 'I am sick' ". (Isaiah 33:24 Revelations 21:3,4)

Wonderful movie!