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also known as Il rosso segno della follia

Hatchet for the Honeymoon1970

  • 3.7
Seven years after innovating the grisly Italian genre known as giallo, Mario Bava returned to the form to create one of its deliriously frightening examples: HATCHET FOR THE HONEYMOON (IL ROSSO SEGNO DELA FOLLIA). Stephen Forsyth stars as John Harrington, the head of an affluent fashion house, who harbors an uncontrollable bloodlust for women in bridal veils. Only by murdering a succession of them, each in a grisly manner, can he delve deeper into his subconscious and bring to light the primal scene that spawned his very specific homicidal fetish.

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Member Reviews (2)

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top reviewer

European men are different from you and me! They dress better; they have more beautiful homes. They even have better excuses for murder. They can borrow from the Greeks to excuse them. This movie is an exercise in kitsch and excessive Freudianism. This high-fashion, psycho designer kills his intended with shiny butcher knife and his own design of bridal veils. If you have never seen it and have nothing else to do, enjoy! It is relatively harmless and seems old-fashioned by our modern lights.

1 member likes this review
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top reviewer

Although it is not the best film in Mario Bava's filmography, there are many small touches in Hatchet for the Honeymoon that draw me back to the movie many years since I first watched it. The editing is very whimsical in certain sections. The cut from a moving train to a toy train is an example that stands out. The montage of toys near the the end always puts smile on my face. Laura Betti is fun to watch as the embittered wife who does not even allow death to prevent her from tormenting her husband. Moreover, the sequences in the room full of mannequins are some of my favorite scenes in all of Bava's work. They are simultaneously creepy and beautiful, featuring dazzling plays of shadow that are a testament to Bava's cinematographic prowess.

The description of Hatchet for the Honeymoon states that it is a giallo, but it feels more like a horror film.