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Fireworks Wednesday2006

  • 4.1
From the two-time Academy Award® winning director of THE SALESMAN and A SEPARATION, Asghar Farhadi's FIREWORKS WEDNESDAY is a gripping, suspenseful drama – a story of marital intrigue and betrayal set against the backdrop of the Persian New Year. Rouhi, a young bride-to-be, is hired as a maid for an affluent family in Tehran. Upon arriving she is suddenly thrust into an explosive domestic conflict. The wife is convinced her husband is having an affair (with a recently divorced woman living next door) and enlists Rouhi as a spy, to follow her husband, and confirm her suspicions. What Rouhi discovers, however, threatens not only their marriage but her own future.

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2 members like this review

While the various dramatic tensions of the story of this upper middle class couple in crisis are brought into sharper focus by way of a more traditional, if not (apparently) religious, context, the problems inherent in any relationship or marriage are clearly universal, as is proven by this much too familiar conflict between husband and wife, though set in a faraway place. In fact, aside from the apparel (most notably women's chadors that serve as metaphors of relationship status), the problems and conflicts at the personal level of the strained marriage were not at all different than if the story had been set in a secular city in western society. The deeper story is seen through the eyes of an innocent bride-to-be, Rouhi, who experiences, and consequently learns, firsthand the ways of love, deceit and trust. The Persian New Year celebrations taking place in the streets of Tehran serve as the tense and unstable backdrop to a life which never stops unfurling questions, hesitations and doubts.

Member Reviews (3)

While the various dramatic tensions of the story of this upper middle class couple in crisis are brought into sharper focus by way of a more traditional, if not (apparently) religious, context, the problems inherent in any relationship or marriage are clearly universal, as is proven by this much too familiar conflict between husband and wife, though set in a faraway place. In fact, aside from the apparel (most notably women's chadors that serve as metaphors of relationship status), the problems and conflicts at the personal level of the strained marriage were not at all different than if the story had been set in a secular city in western society. The deeper story is seen through the eyes of an innocent bride-to-be, Rouhi, who experiences, and consequently learns, firsthand the ways of love, deceit and trust. The Persian New Year celebrations taking place in the streets of Tehran serve as the tense and unstable backdrop to a life which never stops unfurling questions, hesitations and doubts.

2 members like this review

Like the synopsis of the storyline says, except without the "gripping" or "suspenseful". It was a good movie to watch but the ending, unlike the fireworks, ends with a fizzle...

This is a fabulous film. The story line comes across as truly realistic and the acting, especially by the lead actress/wife in this movie is just fantastic. Acting across the board is strong and the small ensemble cast gels perfectly together.