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City Lights1931

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  • 4.7
CITY LIGHTS, the most cherished film by Charlie Chaplin, is also his ultimate Little Tramp chronicle. The writer-director-star achieved new levels of grace, in both physical comedy and dramatic poignancy, with this silent tale of a lovable vagrant falling for a young blind woman who sells flowers on the street and mistakes him for a millionaire. Though this Depression-era smash was made after the advent of sound, Chaplin remained steadfast in his love for the expressive beauty of the pre-talkie form. The result was the epitome of his art and the crowning achievement of silent comedy.

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1 member likes this review

One of my favorite films. I had the opportunity to see it on the big screen in 2014, and it was even more wonderful. My favorite part is the satire of "talkies" in the first scene. The large crowd waiting for the new statue's unveiling with civic leaders making speeches into the prominently displayed microphone with only kazoo noises coming out of their mouths. Then, when they unveil the new monument, representing sound pictures I take it, there is The Little Tramp snoozing on the statue. He entertains the gathered crowd to the chagrin of the speakers on the stage. The film was released when silent films were obsolete, and it was a bold move for Chaplin to maintain his character's silence, but as this scene suggests, The Little Tramp doesn't need a microphone to entertain an audience. In a contest between talent and technical innovations, talent will always win. That hasn't changed.

102752.small
top reviewer

Member Reviews (3)

102752.small
top reviewer

One of my favorite films. I had the opportunity to see it on the big screen in 2014, and it was even more wonderful. My favorite part is the satire of "talkies" in the first scene. The large crowd waiting for the new statue's unveiling with civic leaders making speeches into the prominently displayed microphone with only kazoo noises coming out of their mouths. Then, when they unveil the new monument, representing sound pictures I take it, there is The Little Tramp snoozing on the statue. He entertains the gathered crowd to the chagrin of the speakers on the stage. The film was released when silent films were obsolete, and it was a bold move for Chaplin to maintain his character's silence, but as this scene suggests, The Little Tramp doesn't need a microphone to entertain an audience. In a contest between talent and technical innovations, talent will always win. That hasn't changed.

1 member likes this review
153444.small
filmmaker

One of the greatest films ever made.

145672.small
top reviewer

A very silly movie. You can't hate it and if you do, you either have no sense of humor or you're an asshole. It's all about the end though. One of the best endings to a movie ever.