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also known as Let's Party

C'est parti2011

One morning in a building on the outskirts of Paris, men and women of all ages begin to empty a large office. They threw dozens of files out the window. Among the people, Olivier Besancenot, the famous 35-year-old leader of the French radical left. He and his friends are getting rid of the archives which have been accumulating over the last forty years by their former organization. In a garbage truck, old cabinets, marxist books and campaign plans pile up. In the weeks to follow, all their hard work will turn their dreams into a reality: a new anti-capitalist party, wide and open, which is due to be born one year later to the day. The film follows this beginning, full of hopes and dark traps.

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2 members like this review

The film's window into France's anti-capitalist party is fascinating. The movement flies in the face of all the rancor against, and stunted impetus of the world's Occupy movement following the circa '08 economic debacle (at least in the U.S.) ... not to mention the E.U.'s capitalist shameless austerity, shaming and vilifying of certain nation economies (ahem, Greece) for failure to keep up, comply, obey, etc. etc. Because these are such critical issues (and the voices of these ideas have been so weakened in the U.S.), it would've been great if this film could have covered more in terms of the source of pain, drive to reform and revolt, and overall detail and reality of the economic crisis in E.U. that fails to satisfy the working class people.

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top reviewer

Member Reviews (1)

180311.small
top reviewer

The film's window into France's anti-capitalist party is fascinating. The movement flies in the face of all the rancor against, and stunted impetus of the world's Occupy movement following the circa '08 economic debacle (at least in the U.S.) ... not to mention the E.U.'s capitalist shameless austerity, shaming and vilifying of certain nation economies (ahem, Greece) for failure to keep up, comply, obey, etc. etc. Because these are such critical issues (and the voices of these ideas have been so weakened in the U.S.), it would've been great if this film could have covered more in terms of the source of pain, drive to reform and revolt, and overall detail and reality of the economic crisis in E.U. that fails to satisfy the working class people.

2 members like this review