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Bob and the Monster2012

  • 4.3
This award winning documentary follows outspoken indie-rock hero Bob Forrest, through his life-threatening struggle with addiction, to his transformation into one of the most influential and controversial drug counselors in the US today, appearing alongside Dr. Drew Pinsky on the shows “Celebrity Rehab” and “Sober House”. The film combines contemporary footage, animation and compelling interviews with archival performances and personal videos from Bob's past to reveal the complex layers of this troubled, but hopeful soul. Testimony from his peers, including Courtney Love, Anthony Kiedis, Flea, John Frusciante, members of Jane's Addiction, Fishbone and Guns n' Roses add texture, but it's the depth of Bob's music, interwoven throughout the film, that illuminates this unforgettable and inspirational story.

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4 members like this review

Whether we like it or not, there are still some truly beautiful things in this world. Music. The connections made between people. That defining puff, push, pop, or guzzle that removes the weight of the world from your shoulders and allows you to rise into a space you have never been, and recognize that you want to live in that place, to breathe in that rarified air forever. "Bob and the Monster" shows this, all of this, gloriously. However, we live in a Universe that demands balance. And so, with beauty, comes ugly. "Bob and the Monster" shows this, not all of it, but enough of it, with an honesty that itches. Bob Forrest has a rough exterior that fits perfectly with his punk rock life and a speaking voice borrowed from a past (or future) Dalai Lama. I have seen him work his wonder on reality television rehab shows and wondered why I hadn't met anyone on my rocky road with such insight, wisdom, and patience (my god, the patience! ) How did he get there? Does he deserve the pedestal I was building for him? "Bob and the Monster" proves that, no, of course he doesn't. No one does. That is part of the excellence of this film. It doesn't make Bob a saint, nor a sinner. It does show how a person can go from human to monster to human. It shows that addicts can act like monsters, terrible monsters to themselves and everyone around them and that there is a way to return to human form. This film lets everyone know that just because you get clean, doesn't mean your problems are over. It gets the point across well in an hour and a half. Personally, I'm heading into my 17th year of attempting to remain human. Not easy, not supposed to be. Selfishly, I ask, "Where was a Bob Forrest when I needed one?" Bob Forrest made furious attempts to destroy the beautiful parts of himself. Music. Damn, he tried to kill his music. He became a criminal. And all the time, he was learning. With help, he taught himself to be human again. And he gets to be surrounded by all that goes with it. "Bob and the Monster" is a great story, a scary story, a story with...hope? "Bob and the Monster" is beautiful and ugly, but mostly, necessary.

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Member Reviews (8)

100888.small
top reviewer

Whether we like it or not, there are still some truly beautiful things in this world. Music. The connections made between people. That defining puff, push, pop, or guzzle that removes the weight of the world from your shoulders and allows you to rise into a space you have never been, and recognize that you want to live in that place, to breathe in that rarified air forever. "Bob and the Monster" shows this, all of this, gloriously. However, we live in a Universe that demands balance. And so, with beauty, comes ugly. "Bob and the Monster" shows this, not all of it, but enough of it, with an honesty that itches. Bob Forrest has a rough exterior that fits perfectly with his punk rock life and a speaking voice borrowed from a past (or future) Dalai Lama. I have seen him work his wonder on reality television rehab shows and wondered why I hadn't met anyone on my rocky road with such insight, wisdom, and patience (my god, the patience! ) How did he get there? Does he deserve the pedestal I was building for him? "Bob and the Monster" proves that, no, of course he doesn't. No one does. That is part of the excellence of this film. It doesn't make Bob a saint, nor a sinner. It does show how a person can go from human to monster to human. It shows that addicts can act like monsters, terrible monsters to themselves and everyone around them and that there is a way to return to human form. This film lets everyone know that just because you get clean, doesn't mean your problems are over. It gets the point across well in an hour and a half. Personally, I'm heading into my 17th year of attempting to remain human. Not easy, not supposed to be. Selfishly, I ask, "Where was a Bob Forrest when I needed one?" Bob Forrest made furious attempts to destroy the beautiful parts of himself. Music. Damn, he tried to kill his music. He became a criminal. And all the time, he was learning. With help, he taught himself to be human again. And he gets to be surrounded by all that goes with it. "Bob and the Monster" is a great story, a scary story, a story with...hope? "Bob and the Monster" is beautiful and ugly, but mostly, necessary.

4 members like this review
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Scuzzy and grimy. Hyperactive and guttural. It doesn't have a empirically sleek veneer, but neither does the unhinged subject of the film. A pretty thoroughly entertaining, foot stomping rock documentary with a candid assortment of talking heads. Probably better than it should be, 'Bob and the Monster' is aided by an assortment of animation and full participation by the bands that helped shape LA rock.

1 member likes this review
2efae933f63ea5a471b86a486602ec0b?default=https%3a%2f%2fd3uc4wuqnt61m1.cloudfront.net%2fassets%2favatars%2fmale%2favatar m 0082
top reviewer

I have been interested in Bob Forrest since the first time I watched Celebrity Rehab on VH1. He was more compelling than most of the other players in the drama of addiction recovery. His face told me that he had stories to tell. This meant I had to watch this documentary. Bob Forrest is the leader of the only band in the entire documentary that I did not have intimate knowledge of. Everyone else, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Jane's Addiction, Fishbone, Keith Morris (Black Flag/Circle Jerks), etc are all parts of my record collection, and though I had heard of Thelonious Monster, I had never listened to them. This documentary does a fantastic job going through the rise and collapse of a great band, and Bob Forrest is the unlikely survivor. Watching the transformation through film and through the people testifying to his help, makes you realize that he is a hero, someone to support and someone to help in anyway just like he is helping everyone around him. No questions asked. He has earned every wrinkle in his face and the fire still burning in his eyes.

1 member likes this review
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top reviewer

Thought I'd watch a few minutes of "Bob..." and go about my evening - and, lo & behold, it became my evening. While the film certainly had some depressing & unattractive aspects; scenes of Bob, et al, at their very worst...it moved at a surprisingly professional pace, i.e. it managed to keep your interest: Mostly by showing or talking about or concentrating on each subject just long enough & then moving on at just the right time. Kudos to a Direction & Editing job that could have gone very wrong - in a film like this - (Easily by the self indulgence that similar films fall victim to) but instead managed just right! We saw Bob - & numerous of his both well known & lesser known "friends" (From Flea & Courtney Love to members of "Red Hot Chili Peppers", "Jane's Addiction" & many others) both at their very worst & sober & being very productive &/or contributing fascinating remembrances & commentary on Bob's life & surrounding L.A. punk music scene of the 80's & its environs. If this music & its scene & participants hold any fascination for you I recommend giving it a spin. If, on the other hand, said music & scene are foreign to you the flick may not be for you - yet you could always give it a try & learn about this whole other world - or not!

1 member likes this review

I listen to roots music, 60s garage and punk. REAL punk. I don't like Theloneous Monster, Courtney Love or The Red Hot who gives a crap. I don't like practically any of the music used...but I wanted to see his story anyway, and had actually been looking for it since it was completed. He exposes his life and his history with total open candor: the good years, the family stuff that still obviously pains him, the ways he hurt others, the lowest points, and the open sores. They show his band mates who said he was scum, and the guys he selflessly gave a place to live. He is a full and complex person, a good man who did lots to be ashamed of and to revel in. He's a great representation of an addict, a person and an artist. The notion that to be creative, you had to be a loaded mess was a common one... no matter how stupid. And the struggles to get clean, re-clean and to find purpose by helping others is interesting and well observed here (no matter what you listen to). I'm always glad to see Keith Morris; and will forever love him as Flag's best singer, as well as the front man for the Jerks. Was very happy with this doc. Anyone who came up in the 90s will probably like it a lot more.

1 member likes this review

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I Love this documentary ... It gives me so much inspiration to keep trying. I have been struggling with addiction for over 20 yrs and found myself this last round also fully addicted to Heroin on the streets of Los Angeles where I grew up. Bob Forrest has always struck me as a awesome counselor when I watched him on Celebrity Rehab. I had no idea about his story... I some day want to pass my story on and be a inspiration like BOB...

Awesome!