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Battleship Potemkin1925

  • 4.3
For eight decades, Sergei Eisenstein's 1925 masterpiece has remained one of the most influential silent films of all time. Yet each successive generation has seen BATTLESHIP POTEMKIN subjected to censorship and recutting, its unforgettable power diluted in unauthorized public domain editions from dubious sources until now. Dozens of missing shots have been replaced and all 146 title cards restored to Eisenstein's specifications. Edmund Meisel's definitive 1926 score, magnificently rendered by the 55-piece Deutches Filmorchestra, returns Eisenstein's masterwork to a form as close to its creator's bold vision as has been seen since the film's triumphant 1925 Moscow premiere.

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2 members like this review

Eisenstein sure loved long scenes, didn't he? Well, the captivating visuals make up for that and the scene on the Odessa steps is everything it's been made out to be. Well worth watching.

Member Reviews (4)

Eisenstein sure loved long scenes, didn't he? Well, the captivating visuals make up for that and the scene on the Odessa steps is everything it's been made out to be. Well worth watching.

2 members like this review
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top reviewer

People make a big fuss about Eisenstein's use of montage, and rightly so. But I'm more struck by the beauty of his individual compositions, ranging from majestic establishing shots to ultra emotional close-ups. The scope is simply breathtaking. Even if you don't agree with the highly propagandized message of the movie, enjoy it for being just so darn pretty.

A very high level of artistry regarding light and movement. I found the first part of the movie a bit slow, but the last half (especially the scenes in Odessa, justifiably famous) is brilliant.

A classic. I love Soviet Montage, well actually I love creative / intellectual montage of any sort and Eisenstein was a master of this editing technique. The Odessa steps sequence is one of the most famous sequences in the history of cinema and rightfully so. It is harrowing but the entire film, Battleship Potemkin, is brilliant. It speaks truth to power with the best of them and sadly there aren't enough of them.