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As Others See Us1953

  • 3.6
Are you dressed correctly? Are you eating properly? No. You are doing it all wrong. This short will correct your behavior. Or else! Produced by Social Science Films in 1953, you'll know exactly how others see you within ten minutes. It won't be pretty.

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What makes this film worth watching? See All Reviews

1 member likes this review

Though heavy handed, the film makes a point that is still valid: knowing the conventions and comfortably using them is a democratizing process. Manners are the enemy, not the agent, of snobbery.

If we all held the door for everybody--regardless of outward appearance, gender, race, and so on--we might be reminded each day of our commonalities, rather than our differences. Small acts of mutual respect are still small, but they can be significant.

Member Reviews (14)

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top reviewer

Manners are important. Young people often do not understand how important they are as a social lubricant even today. However, manners change over time. In 1953, apparently, it was important to know that "it is a man's world" and when you go into a restaurant and there is a hostess, the lady goes first; but if no hostess then the man goes first. I'm not sure that is important today. The film also tells us to drink lots of whole milk! (Was this financed by the dairy industry?) I also notice that the only minority person in the film is the waiter taking their order. I think this film assumes everyone is white, and upper middle class.

1 member likes this review

It is what it is: doesn't seem to need rating. It is a period piece. Easy to laugh at, but an accurate mirror of how people through the late 40s and 50s were raised. Behind it all is the naive idea that a preachy film like that would make a difference. What an artificial world the 50s were.

1 member likes this review

Though heavy handed, the film makes a point that is still valid: knowing the conventions and comfortably using them is a democratizing process. Manners are the enemy, not the agent, of snobbery.

If we all held the door for everybody--regardless of outward appearance, gender, race, and so on--we might be reminded each day of our commonalities, rather than our differences. Small acts of mutual respect are still small, but they can be significant.

1 member likes this review
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top reviewer

While watching the film I experienced two flashbacks. In one, I was the A/V nerd, carrying gear from classroom to classroom, showing films such as this and slide shows with similar material. I also thought about the revolutionary behavior of the Beats, Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, Gregory Corso, Neal Cassady, William Burroughs. Their manners encompassed consuming great quantities of drugs, living in slums, driving across the nation, writing wild poetry, engaging in hetero and homo sexual sex. On the one side we see these cute little button up civilians, while on the other we see a group living completely outside those norms, altering social norms (they set the seeds for the Sixties) and in some instances revealing the truth behind the people with manners. They didn't mind hanging Negroes by the neck, executing civilian prisoners, maintaining formal rather than casual whorehouses and spreading their toxic fantasy across the entire planet. With the recent advent of drones as military weapons the cute people have turned the entire planet into a free fire zone.

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top reviewer

Excellent advice. Except for the lousy advice about what food is good for you!

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top reviewer

Oh bless their hearts, this was just darling!

How strange that the narrator comes clean about sexism & male domination within the context of ordering dinner at a restaurant. "You might as well learn this now. When it comes to ordering food, it's likely to be a man's world for a long, long time to come." It's 1953, so the countdown is on. The irony is so thick I'm choking on it over here! Pass the milk! (Supplied by our gracious sponsor.)

Oh, how many of our youth today could benefit from this.

Nice mid-century modern lamp sitting next to the record player!

Its a man's world...when ordering.

This is an excellent portrail of things as they once were and might put a 'bee in the bonnet' of a young person today.

I'm speechless..............

Thanks!!

I love the repeated reassurances that confirm that it is a man's world, and that it will stay one for many generations to come. A truly edifying short film.