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Suzan Pitt

Suzan Pitt is an internationally acclaimed painter and filmmaker who discovered animation in 1971 with the purchase of a Bolex regular 8 camera- with this camera she began to animate cut outs on the floor of her storefront studio in Minneapolis. Without any formal filmmaking training she has continued to make films to the present day along with periods of art-making, theater design, and public murals. During the 1980’s her paintings and wood constructions were exhibited widely in the US and Europe and many works are now in private collections and museums.  During this period she designed the first opera production which utilized film projection on the stage for a production of  “The Magic Flute” in Wiesbaden Germany and a production of Berlioz’ “The Damnation of Faust” in Hamburg for which she created one hour of experimental animation which was projected behind and in front of the stage throughout the opera. Other projects include a 17’ mural of the woodland of upper Michigan, a 30’ mural of the endangered species of Wisconsin, and an 80’ train painting which traveled around the US.

She brings to animation an artist’s concerns with the psychological, emotional, and philosophical themes which have informed her slow-moving, highly detailed 35mm films. Isolation, depression, the destruction of nature, the unfolding of creative instincts, and the miraculous in Mexican mythology are major themes which unfold in her poetic evolving imagery. She says “ I find in daydreaming a spatial psychic reality where I can in semi-consciousness imagine scenarios and interactions.  I depend on my intuition to guide the creation of pictorial associations which are non-narrative but manage to tell a kind of “story”. I am aware of “audience” both in my painting and in my films and think of my work as interactive.  In the thousands of decisions I make in creating images and expressing ideas I am constantly balancing my desire to create work which manifests my personal view of existence but at the same time reaches out into “visibility”, into the world. The challenge is in creating newness and originality within our human backlog of recognition.

Suzan Pitt’s prize-winning animated films have been featured at many prestigious venues around the world, including The Museum of Modern Art, Sundance Film Festival, New York Film Festival, London Film Festival, the Stuttgart International Film Festival, , Morelia International Film Festival, and the Image Forum Festival in Tokyo.  ASPARAGUS was recently honored by The International Association of Film Animation (ASIFA) as one of the 50 best animated films of the past half century. She was honored in March 2013 with a two program retrospective of her animation films 1970-2013 at the Ann Arbor Film Festival.  Touring programs of her work have been seen in Europe, Great Britain, the US, and Japan.

[bio courtesy of the filmmaker] 

Filmography

Recent Reviews

Joy Street

I was impressed by the animation. The color/composition was a bit all over the place but its style speaks true of the time period in which it was made. It...


Joy Street

Cute animation and cute little story.


Joy Street

Visually entertaining. Great story-telling without the use of speech.


Pinball

Art isn't static. It's not a fixture on a wall. It is a living, pulsating form of energy, radiating around us and within us. Suzan Pitt's imaginative depiction of a...


El Doctor

Top quality animation.