Jean Genet

Jean Genet (French pronunciation: [ʒɑ̃ ʒəˈnɛ]) ((1910-12-19)December 19, 1910 – April 15, 1986(1986-04-15)) was a prominent and controversial French novelist, playwright, poet, essayist, and political activist. Early in his life he was a vagabond and petty criminal, but later took to writing. His major works include the novels Querelle of Brest, The Thief's Journal, and Our Lady of the Flowers, and the plays The Balcony, The Blacks, The Maids and The Screens. Genet's mother was a young prostitute who raised him for the first year of his life before putting him up for adoption. Thereafter Genet was raised in the provinces by a carpenter and his family who, according to Edmund White's biography, were loving and attentive. While he received excellent grades in school, his childhood involved a series of attempts at running away and incidents of petty theft (although White also suggests that Genet's later claims of a dismal, impoverished childhood were exaggerated to fit his outlaw image). After the death of his foster mother, Genet was placed with an elderly couple but remained with them less than two years.

Story

Freebase CC-BY
Source: Jean Genet on Freebase, licensed under CC-BY
Other content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA