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The Big Ones | DR. MABUSE, THE GAMBLER

April 4, 2013

Why is DR. MABUSE such a forward-looking piece of modern cinema?

Documentary Unbound: Actuality, Actually

April 2, 2013 | One Comment

Artists working on either side of the digital divide explore the lyrical allure of the ‘actuality’ film.

The Color of Silents

March 14, 2013 | 3 Comments
The Red Spectre

We don’t get it, so let’s forget it? Of all the misconceptions of silent-era cinema that linger, the idea that the films were solely black and white may be the hardest to correct.

The Film 100: Eadweard Muybridge, no. 34

February 25, 2013
EDWEARD MUYBRIDGE

Muybridge’s persistent spirit wrestled with a basic limitation in photography, finally uncovering a revolutionary new way of bringing images together to create something quite magical.

The Film 100: Mary Pickford, no. 4

February 24, 2013 | One Comment
TESS OF THE STORM COUNTRY

Pickford was not the result of a star system, she was its genesis.

The Film 100: Anita Loos, no. 25

February 22, 2013
GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES

Few have ever matched the style of the teenage scenarist who literally set the tone of movie dialogue.

DAILY | Silent Winter 2013

February 16, 2013
Faust

San Francisco’s Silent Film Festival presents a SNOW WHITE that struck Disney‘s fancy, a trio of Buster Keaton shorts, a Douglas Fairbanks blockbuster, Mary Pickford’s last silent and F.W. Murnau‘s FAUST. Updated through 2/24.

The Film 100: D.W. Griffith, no. 8

January 14, 2013
BIRTH OF A NATION

Celebrated as one of the century’s great renaissance men, director D.W. Griffith invented a film grammar that lives on today.

The Film 100: Edwin S. Porter, no. 2

January 9, 2013
THE GREAT TRAIN ROBBERY

As the industry’s focus shifted from cameraman to director, Porter defined the ideal of a master craftsman for such silent-era directors as D.W. Griffith and King Vidor.

The Film 100: Buster Keaton, no. 38

December 26, 2012
THE GENERAL

Keaton established himself as an icon—the unwitting simpleton overrun by the modern mechanized world—repeatedly using his physical dexterity to overcome intractable machines.

The Film 100: Auguste and Louis Lumière, no. 61

December 25, 2012 | One Comment
WORKERS LEAVING THE LUMIÈRE FACTORY

By developing a single-unit device that was portable, the Lumières were able to document the outside world in moving pictures.

The Film 100: Mack Sennett, no. 95

December 23, 2012
TILLIE'S PUNCTURED ROMANCE

Sennett comedies developed a distinct style: devoid of logic, full of anarchy, completely over the top.